Pacific Internet and Macs

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  1. #1

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    Pacific Internet and Macs

    I have just moved to HK and am in the process of finding somewhere to live. Once that is sorted out, I will want to get broadband access (doesn't have to be very high speed, but dial-up won't do). Thanks to various threads on this forum, I have the following list of Broadband ISPs:



    At this stage I am not sure how long I am going to be here - I have committed to one year, but that can easily be extended to three years. However, the property I am currently looking at may be sold within six months, so I am a little nervous. As a result I would like to keep the contract down to as short as possible. I realise that Netvigator does a monthly deal, but the download limits seem rather extreme (and their standard deals are 24months). I have noted that Pacific Internet have a package that is for one year and that appears to only be $168 for 1.5Mbps, but they say that it will not work with Macs, which would be a pity because I am thinking about getting a Powerbook (and am planning to convert my old desktop to Ubuntu Linux). Does anyone know whether this restriction is just about setting up the service, or whether it has further implications? Incidentally I note that some of the IPs make a comment about limiting the number of users - presumably if you set up a router (wireless) as I was planning to do, this won't apply (as long as it acts as a proxy).

    Any comments would be welcome. I realise that this posting has gone beyond the question that I planned to ask...

    Incidentally, I am not planning to have a home phone line (I think that a 3G mobile phone service is more to my taste), and I realise that I am going to have to see if Pacific Internet serve the property I end up in (if I want to go with them).

  2. #2

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    Oh... just found a page in English on HK Broadband Network's website - here.


  3. #3

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    PCCW would be the best bet if you are thinking of moving properties - they can serve pretty much anywhere - the others are somewhat limited.

    Avoid i-cable at all costs.

    If you're going to want cable TV then you'll be getting that from PCCW/NOW over a broadband connection anyway, so if you buy another one from someone else you're going top be paying more overall (and there may be problems not having enough building wiring to your apartment).


  4. #4

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    Most folks I know end up buy a simple wi-fi router which connects via PPPoE and makes the "OS support" pretty much irrelevant, as long as the OS can support Wi Fi.

    Agree with PDLM that PCCW / Netvigator is really one of the best choices out there for a broadband connection, specially if you're looking for cable tv ...


  5. #5

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    Netvigator does not have any better coverage than any of the 10 or so ISPs that use PCCW copper to provide their own broadband service.

    The best choice IS to use any ISP that uses PCCW broadband circuits, to get the best coverage you don't have to actually signup to Netvigator.

    To clarify:
    PCCW = copper circuits, DSL/ATM operator
    Netvigator = Public Internet IP service.

    Netvigator does NOT have a more access that any of the (following) ISPs PCCW leases circuits to: Netfront, Pacific supernet, CPCNET, cyberexpress, OneBB and another 6 or 10 more.

    Going with another ISP that uses PCCW has to the advantage that if you move, and another FTNS operator has coverage in the building you can change the type of physical circuit. These ISPs provide you internet services using physical circuits of Wharf T&T, NWT, HGC, and if you have serious fiber requirements, Traxcom(MTR), TownGas Telecom, etc...

    So sometimes you can start with a with what ever ISP using a PCCW circuit and if you move and have coverage you can chose from PCCW or Wharf physical circuit. The other telcos tend to offer fatter circuits and far lower prices.

    Last edited by hk.com; 28-01-2007 at 04:56 AM.

  6. #6

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    Thank you for the swift reply. I am actually thinking of not signing up to TV. Does that change anything?


  7. #7

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    Talking

    I think the non-Mac support is only applicable during initial set-up. Once you have the modem rigged up to a Wi-Fi router, I don't see why a Mac can't connect to it. Afterall, Wi-Fi is Wi-Fi, and doesn't come in PC or Mac flavours.

    The sales people may try and talk you into the TV package. They're hoping for 'add-on' sales, ie that you'll subscribe to more channels, or the full package at a later date. Just stand your ground.


  8. #8

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by muchado
    Thank you for the swift reply. I am actually thinking of not signing up to TV. Does that change anything?
    I came back from US 1.5 months ago. I went into the same dilemma that you are facing. At the end I pick the PCCW package that include free NOW TV. 8Mbps. (for 6 MBps) price. 2 year contract.

    I avoided icable because they want to punch a hole on the wall to bring in new cable. Not a probably for most people but I am just picky.

    If you want the least expensive internet connection deal, Icable is cheaper. If you want most comprehensive internet connect connection support, choose PCCW. Although there has been multiple outage slowness this month, we do not have much choice in HK. Others can be worse.

    IF your new apartment support HK Broadband (most do not yet), this would be the only option I may consider because they have faster connection speed. This may not speed up overseas site.

    NOW TV is free (at least for my package) and I found it pretty useful when I want to watch CNBC or other international channels. The main annoyance w/ PCCW that bothers me is the long two year contract. I think it's two year.

    The technician I have installed the router part and is aware of mac setup. He'll get you up and running with no problem. If you want wireless acces at home, you will need to set up that yourself. But once you know how to setup your mac side w/ wired 10BT, the wireless side should be intuitive. (I bought a netgear router WGR614. It works flawlessly with my macbook pro.)

    BRUCE
    Last edited by bruce999; 28-01-2007 at 03:44 PM.