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Digital Camera and battery maintenance

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  1. #1

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    Digital Camera and battery maintenance

    I am use canon digital camera. It uses NB-4L NB4L Battery

    I have a question - Do you keep battery in camera if camera is not in use for week or more. Or should the battery be taken out of camera ??

    great if you can share experience


  2. #2

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    A week or 2 should not be a problem, but in general if you're not using the camera probably best to take the battery out.


  3. #3

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    I take the batteries out if I know that the camera is going to be unused for six months, and if I remember.

    Generally, it really isn't something that I could be bothered worrying about, and I've spent enough of my time building my own balanced lithium battery packs to be accused of being mildly obsessed with these things.

    If you're using the original battery, it's probably very safe. Unlike older nickel-based technologies, the battery will stay charged pretty much indefinitely. If you are anal about it, store the batter at half charge to maximise shelf life.

    climber07 likes this.

  4. #4

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    Just curious, why do you make your own lithium battery packs?


  5. #5

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    Agree with jgl....storing the batteries at half charge is ideal. It's best not to let the batteries drain completely to extend life.


  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by climber07
    Agree with jgl....storing the batteries at half charge is ideal. It's best not to let the batteries drain completely to extend life.
    How come?

    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using GeoClicks Mobile

  7. #7

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    @robert: to drive simple electronics DIY projects.

    @Loz: The two factors that drive degradation of lithium battery capacities are heat and charge state. Charge state is a bigger factor than heat. Have a look at the second table here. Someone did a bunch of testing and found that storing a fully charged cell caused a 20% capacity loss over a year.

    Admittedly, the article is from several years ago. Maybe manufacturers have figured out how to maintain capacities over high charge states, but I haven't heard anything like this. I've also noticed that most the electronics I buy come with half-charged batteries, presumably to maintain battery life during stock storage.

    The only recent development I'm aware of in rechargables are are the Low Self Discharge Nickle Metal Hydrides (Sony Enerloop AA cells) but these types of battery are not used in cameras.

    Oh, and the advice that shop assistants give you about "make sure you charge the battery overnight before using it" is ignorant bullshit. It's based on a misunderstanding of nickel-based battery chemistries from over 20 years ago. Lithiums are good to use straight out of the box- you don't have to waste hours doing an initial priming charge.

    Last edited by jgl; 30-05-2012 at 09:43 AM.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl
    @robert: to drive simple electronics DIY projects.

    @Loz: The two factors that drive degradation of lithium battery capacities are heat and charge state. Charge state is a bigger factor than heat. Have a look at the second table here. Someone did a bunch of testing and found that storing a fully charged cell caused a 20% capacity loss over a year.
    96% of 40% is still less than 80% of 100% though; but the purpose of the test was to compare the discharge at different temperature levels, not to determine at what capacity you should store the battery.

    That being said according to this article 40% capacity seems recommended by manufacturers for long term storage of Li-Ion batteries, but a cool and dry place is more important.

    Oh, and the advice that shop assistants give you about "make sure you charge the battery overnight before using it" is ignorant bullshit. It's based on a misunderstanding of nickel-based battery chemistries from over 20 years ago. Lithiums are good to use straight out of the box- you don't have to waste hours doing an initial priming charge.
    Correct but I think the advise is just given to ensure you have 100% capacity before using it since the capacity has decreased during storage and thus you may run out of power quickly if you use it straight out of the box.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raccon
    96% of 40% is still less than 80% of 100% though; but the purpose of the test was to compare the discharge at different temperature levels, not to determine at what capacity you should store the battery.
    I think you're misreading the findings. The article talks about recoverable capacity. i.e. the cells will be recharged to full, then discharged to see how much total capacity loss has occurred.

    For example:
    • A 1000mAh cell stored at 40% charge at 25C for a year can be recharged to hold 960mAh.
    • A 1000mAh cell stored at 100% charge at 25C for a year can be recharged to hold 800mAh.


    Quote Originally Posted by Raccon
    Correct but I think the advise is just given to ensure you have 100% capacity before using it since the capacity has decreased during storage and thus you may run out of power quickly if you use it straight out of the box.
    Yeah, that might cause some returns from particularly clueless purchasers who expect a full charge, and then don't try recharging before returning the item. Kind of a valid line to give people from a business perspective.

    However, I've occasionally quizzed electronic sales people when they tell me this, and I've found that they don't understand the reasoning and believe that it will somehow damage long term battery life. This was a (debatable) characteristic found in very early generation NiCads under very unusual circumstances called the "memory effect". Memory effect doesn't exist with NiMH or Lithium chemistries.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl
    I think you're misreading the findings. The article talks about recoverable capacity. i.e. the cells will be recharged to full, then discharged to see how much total capacity loss has occurred.

    For example:
    • A 1000mAh cell stored at 40% charge at 25C for a year can be recharged to hold 960mAh.
    • A 1000mAh cell stored at 100% charge at 25C for a year can be recharged to hold 800mAh.
    You are right, I misread it. Its' actually explained in the other article that shows the same table:
    Storage will always cause batteries to age. Low temperature and partial SoC only slow the effect. Table 1 illustrates the recoverable capacity of lithium- and nickel-based batteries at various temperatures and charge levels over one year. The recovered capacity is defined as the available battery capacity after storage with a full charge.

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