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3D Printers and Rapid Prototyping?

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  1. #11

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    Wow. Talk about science fiction becoming real life.

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  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by MovingIn07
    Wow. Talk about science fiction becoming real life.
    Are you going to discuss it with Sugar Baby....lol

    Seriously though, bloody amazing things aren't they?

    What fascinates me is the copyright issues. For example, I have two boys, could I buy 1 toy car and make a copy so the boys have one each?

    What about instead of buying a physical toy car, you download it from ToysRUs.com....
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  3. #13

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    Actually I haven't really found anything useful after I posted this thread. I contacted a few 3D printer and prototyping facilities, but what I gathered was that all 3D printers available for the "mass market" are toys, and the professional ones are meant for a few pieces that will cost you an arm and a leg.

    CNC was the way forward. We made our boards (120x120mm with lots of different openings and corners) from acrylic and used an old fashioned CNC machine and a real person to make them. That was last year. For the next lot I may look into laser cut, if anyone has any pointers please let me know. There must be somebody in the city do that, since we have so many company logos and window decorations cut out of acrylic in HK.

    Anyway, back to 3D printers. I guess you all saw this at Kickstarter:

    FORM 1: An affordable, professional 3D printer
    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...nal-3d-printer

    Last edited by 100LL; 26-02-2013 at 09:57 PM.
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  4. #14

  5. #15
    BCD
    BCD is offline

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    Try contacting places that make architectural models. Usually in Shenzhen. They have laser cutters. There are few acrylic shops on Jervois st Sheung Wan, but they do signs and displays. I think you will have better luck with model makers.


    "For the next lot I may look into laser cut, if anyone has any pointers please let me know. There must be somebody in the city do that, since we have so many company logos and window decorations cut out of acrylic in HK."

    100LL likes this.

  6. #16
    preludefan

    Hk hackerspace threw out their reprap due to reliably problems. .reprap is ok for one person/family..the hackerspace reprap couldn't deal with non stop use by many people so they told me...

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using GeoClicks mobile app


  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by bryant.english
    Are you going to discuss it with Sugar Baby....lol

    Seriously though, bloody amazing things aren't they?

    What fascinates me is the copyright issues. For example, I have two boys, could I buy 1 toy car and make a copy so the boys have one each?

    What about instead of buying a physical toy car, you download it from ToysRUs.com....
    So far I think this kind of idea is a bit of a journalistic fantasy, with journos starved for new ideas to, well, kind of gush over. 3D printing a toy car is going to result in a solid lump of plastic with no moving parts, in one colour. Not exactly interesting to any kid over, say, a year old. In which case you may as well save some trouble and give the kid an old ice cream container.

    So unless you take the time to print out lots of separate, complex parts, fit them together, and paint them, the kids end up with a boring lump of plastic. And even if you did do all that, most toy cars these days have spring wound engines or electronics for noises, which can't be achieved through 3D printing.

    I'm strongly of the belief that for the foreseeable future, 3D printing is going to be an occasionally useful industry prototyping tool and a pure geek toy for the home user.

    I've spoken to someone who does design toy cars for a living, and he wrote off 3D printing for prototyping/development as pretty much useless for his industry.

    One of my cutting-edge geek friends, who is always an early adopter of tech and a good programmer, self-assembled one over a year ago, and all does is present him with interesting coding/design challenges. He hasn't produced anything actually useful with it. We both find Sugru and low-temp setting plastic to be considerably more useful around the house.
    Last edited by jgl; 19-11-2013 at 09:36 AM.
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  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by preludefan
    Hk hackerspace threw out their reprap due to reliably problems. .reprap is ok for one person/family..the hackerspace reprap couldn't deal with non stop use by many people so they told me...
    Hard to believe. The Reprap by definition is highly modular. If one piece malfunctions you simply replace it and you are up again. It malfunctions again, you replace it with something better.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl
    So far I think this kind of idea is a bit of a journalistic fantasy, with journos starved for new ideas to, well, kind of gush over. 3D printing a toy car is going to result in a solid lump of plastic with no moving parts, in one colour. Not exactly interesting to any kid over, say, a year old. In which case you may as well save some trouble and give the kid an old ice cream container.

    So unless you take the time to print out lots of separate, complex parts, fit them together, and paint them, the kids end up with a boring lump of plastic. And even if you did do all that, most toy cars these days have spring wound engines or electronics for noises, which can't be achieved through 3D printing.

    I'm strongly of the belief that for the foreseeable future, 3D printing is going to be an occasionally useful industry prototyping tool and a pure geek toy for the home user.

    I've spoken to someone who does design toy cars for a living, and he wrote off 3D printing for prototyping/development as pretty much useless for his industry.

    One of my cutting-edge geek friends, who is always an early adopter of tech and a good programmer, self-assembled one over a year ago, and all does is present him with interesting coding/design challenges. He hasn't produced anything actually useful with it. We both find Sugru and low-temp setting plastic to be considerably more useful around the house.

    sugru and polymorph are much better solutions and solving problems than 3d printing at this current moment.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by imparanoic
    sugru and polymorph are much better solutions and solving problems than 3d printing at this current moment.
    I keep wanting to buy a 3D printer to mess with, but cannot come up with any plausible justifications. Anything that I'd want to 3D print would have to be made of metal and a replacement for CNC, which isn't practical for consumer use.

    Reading the 3D printing Wikipedia article is less than encouraging:

    "As of 2012, domestic 3D printing has mainly captivated hobbyists and enthusiasts and has not quite gained recognition for practical household applications. A working clock has been made[48] and gears have been printed for home woodworking machines[49] among other purposes.[50] 3D printing is also used for ornamental objects. Web sites associated with home 3D printing tend to include backscratchers, coathooks, doorknobs etc."

    Doorknobs and coathooks. Yay.
    Last edited by jgl; 19-11-2013 at 10:13 AM.
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