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Please teach me about electricity

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  1. #1

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    Please teach me about electricity

    I came across a wind power produce that produces

    100 V AC electricity at 50/60 Hz

    What does it mean? How many electrical appliances can that wind power station run (concurrently) if it produces "100 V AC electricity at 50/60 Hz"? One appliance which consumes 100 V of electricity (e.g. a television)?


  2. #2
    jgl
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    The figures to determine how many 'appliances' you can power are either Amps or Watts.

    Also keep in mind that any local appliances are going to run on 240V and so probably won't work with a 100V source.


  3. #3

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    Any information on the kWh kilo watt hour or kVA on the ultimate output?? 100V is just the potential difference and has to be stepped up to 240V if for use HK..u need the information on power produced (kWh or kVA) and the power consumed (Watt/Ampere rating of the Tv, Fridge, Air con etc..)


  4. #4

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    Thanks! Yes, I know the 240 V v. 110 V used in USA and Japan.

    Suppose I was in Japan.

    This windmill produces 250 Wh of electricity. The unit produces 100 V AC electricity at 50/60 Hz, so it can be used to power appliances around the (Japanese) home.

    Is this information sufficient?

    Last edited by cheepo; 26-02-2013 at 04:17 PM.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl:
    The figures to determine how many 'appliances' you can power are either Amps or Watts.

    Also keep in mind that any local appliances are going to run on 240V and so probably won't work with a 100V source.
    unless you use a step up transformer

  6. #6
    jgl
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    I believe the correct unit of measurement is simply "watt", not "watt hour", the latter measuring energy usage over time and for billing purposes. Though in this case they are interchangable and it sounds like you can basically run a single 250W device when the generator is running at full power.

    What do you want to use this for anyway? A single device doesn't sound very useful for much beyond occasionally recharging a battery as wind isn't reliable here.


  7. #7

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    Thanks!!! Very much appreciated!!!


  8. #8
    jgl
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    What do you want to use it for?


  9. #9

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    I am not planning to buy it. I was just interested. I like to educate myself


  10. #10

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    If you are really interested in learning more, you could come to some of the classes run by Dim Sum Labs in the Hong Kong Hackerspace. They help people learn to 'make' things using common electronics parts like Arduinos and whatnot. You'll be able to walk the gadget markets of Ap Liu Street and Shenzhen and know what most of the parts you see are capable of doing.

    http://dimsumlabs.com


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