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IP security cameras - recording onto NAS drive

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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by 100LL
    Some of these web cameras have just that. An SD card slot, and a web interface to define the settings for motion detect, how long you want to record, etc

    Also some cheap ones. Go to Golden Arcade with a little bit of $$$ and you will come back with what you need.
    But not linked to a common cloud storage providers that I can see.

    I was going to link to a NAS drive but it would mean buying a new one and getting rid of the awful Western Digital thing I have now. I will wait a few months until they come out.

  2. #12

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    You're talking about a decent amount of up bandwidth so that may be a stickijng point

    And when you are talking security again are you just wanting to check in that everything looks OK? Or are you looking to have evidence level cctv for a discernable face shot for police. An alarm might ne cheaper at this price point

    BTW don't forget you have to watch to footage


  3. #13

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    If you get a D-Link for example with built-in SD card, you don't need dropbox or a NAS to view remotely.. You can access the camera through the "D-Link Cloud" from anywhere..
    FYI, the SD card enabled models tend to cost around $500 more than their counterparts..

    East_coast likes this.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by East_coast
    It is just for security when on business trips for a few days to a week. So a motion sensor that activates the camera should mean a couple of Gb is all that is needed for good resolution video.

    Given technology that exists it would seem the below should be offered but isn't yet

    - IP Camera with
    • - Motion sensor activation
    • - night vision
    • - small amount of on-board memory e.g. 8Gb
    • - Wifi enabled
    • - link to common cloud storage e.g. OneDrive, Drop Box, Google drive
    • - Back-up to the designated cloud when connected to wifi
    • - Remote access via apps


    All that is needed is for existing technology to have a slot for an SD card and a little bit of software with the right protocols to allow link and transfer of files to common cloud storage facilities and hey presto a secure offline off site home surveillance system at very low price.

    I will wait X months until some company in China comes up with such a product.
    A couple of points on top of what other people have already said, based on some of my own home dabbling.

    Consumer IP cameras are typically either VGA or 720p, which is around 0.3 to 1 megapixel. If you're thinking more resolution than that, you are probably confusing them with real cameras which have multi-megapixel resolution. If you run a VGA res camera in an area that sees much movement then you're looking at around 10GB a day so you really need to make sure your motion sensing is properly tuned.

    I looked at QNAP NASes a while back with IP camera recording in mind. Back then, QNAP was a write-off. Very patchy camera support list and very patchy customer support reviews. Synology seemed to be much further ahead in this, but there was a higher associated cost (possibly for additional camera licenses, I can't remember).

    Having looked at how much CPU is consumed for recording on a Windows server, I am not sure that a small NAS would deal very well with a couple of camera inputs, especially if they were higher res. NAS CPUs kind of suck, and video encoding seems to take a reasonable amount of CPU. Check forums whether the NAS you want is capable of supporting the number of cameras you want. I'm not sure an Atom would deal well with even two cameras.

    If you are using an SD card, keep in mind that it could be pretty easy to pop the card out, or take the camera. This might not be a concern if you are using it as a security camera.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by chichow
    You're talking about a decent amount of up bandwidth so that may be a sticking point

    And when you are talking security again are you just wanting to check in that everything looks OK? Or are you looking to have evidence level cctv for a discernable face shot for police. An alarm might ne cheaper at this price point

    BTW don't forget you have to watch to footage
    If the camera has motion sensing activation and on-board memory then the video footage can hopefully be drip-fed to a cloud at a more leisurely rate eradicating bandwidth issues.

    Quote Originally Posted by jgl
    A couple of points on top of what other people have already said, based on some of my own home dabbling.

    Consumer IP cameras are typically either VGA or 720p, which is around 0.3 to 1 megapixel. If you're thinking more resolution than that, you are probably confusing them with real cameras which have multi-megapixel resolution. If you run a VGA res camera in an area that sees much movement then you're looking at around 10GB a day so you really need to make sure your motion sensing is properly tuned.

    I looked at QNAP NASes a while back with IP camera recording in mind. Back then, QNAP was a write-off. Very patchy camera support list and very patchy customer support reviews. Synology seemed to be much further ahead in this, but there was a higher associated cost (possibly for additional camera licenses, I can't remember).

    Having looked at how much CPU is consumed for recording on a Windows server, I am not sure that a small NAS would deal very well with a couple of camera inputs, especially if they were higher res. NAS CPUs kind of suck, and video encoding seems to take a reasonable amount of CPU. Check forums whether the NAS you want is capable of supporting the number of cameras you want. I'm not sure an Atom would deal well with even two cameras.

    If you are using an SD card, keep in mind that it could be pretty easy to pop the card out, or take the camera. This might not be a concern if you are using it as a security camera.
    The potential use is just as a security camera at home. Not looking for pilfering or sweethearting so hopefully the camera will see near zero use while I am away and not much more while I am home.

    While I'm home the front door gets opened maybe 4x per day and the balcony back door even less about 4 x a week. So maybe 30 mins footage per day in normal times and zero while away. Balcony is accessible to an intrepid burglar and the front door by a bold burglar.

    Uploading to a cloud would make it more secure as they may steal the NAS drive and more future proof!!!

    Anyway a dummy camera with a motion activated blinking LED would probably have the same effect.

    I really should stop developing the ideal spec in my mind and purchase what is available now.
    Last edited by East_coast; 22-04-2014 at 10:38 AM.

  6. #16

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    Thank you all

    http://forums.dlink.com/index.php?ac...;topic=58042.0

    It seems D-Link have released a firmware upgrade to allow access to storage on Google Drive from their cloud device.

    I'll wait a little longer until the system I want comes out!

    Deterrence is from the fear of being caught. Off-site cloud increases the possibility of the 'filth' getting a copy of the video.

    Last edited by East_coast; 22-04-2014 at 11:01 AM.

  7. #17

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    Don't forget IR cameras! There's nothing more dissapointing than not being able to see when the sun goes down.


  8. #18

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    dont forget openwrt router plus webcam same effect and waaaaay cheaper and the webcams get some great resolution.


  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis82
    dont forget openwrt router plus webcam same effect and waaaaay cheaper and the webcams get some great resolution.
    And how does using OpenWRT and a webcam give you local or remotely stored video recordings?

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