desktop publishing

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  1. #11

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    I like inkscape also, some of the tools are really pure genius.
    But i had a lot of issues with it also, crashes, freezes etc. so for me it was back to AI.
    Been a while since i used inkscape now about 1 year ago so might have changed. will dload it again and give it a try.
    Well worth a try for anyone unfamiliar with it, just to see some great tool feats.


  2. #12

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    If it's been a year I strongly suggest you upgrade.
    We're not far off doing a new release with many more performance and stability fixed.

    One thing in particular is our rendering API .. faster and more precise.
    also there's a major overhaul of out computational geometry code.

    What does it mean? more possibilities, faster with more precision.

    oh and now you can open, edit and save PDF files :-)

    We're still trying to keep inkscape the easiest to use vector graphics editor, so feedback in the form of bug reports is greatly appreciated http://bugs.launchpad.net/inkscape

    Inkscape. Draw Freely. is the inkscape download for those interested


  3. #13

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    All I can say is that InDesign is Industry standard. If something wants to come and take that title away from it (much like InDesign came and took the title away from QuarkXPress), then nice. Otherwise in the Industry I highly recommend whatever the latest Adobe CS package is.

    Coral Draw does do some nice pre-press work, I worked at a print shop once and impositioning was a breeze in Coral Draw. Unfortunately this is the only thing I prefer about this program from an Industry perspective.


  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyFitz
    We're still trying to keep inkscape the easiest to use vector graphics editor, so feedback in the form of bug reports is greatly appreciated http://bugs.launchpad.net/inkscape
    Is that SVG crap fixed yet?

    https://bugs.launchpad.net/inkscape/+bug/167335


    Just reminded me of shit with Scribus, they broke their format like three to four times with absolutely useless backward compatibility. Really frigging lame considering it's uses an XML file format which is supposed to circumvent most of these problems. The developers just didn't want the additional legacy baggage

    Last edited by MrMoo; 20-10-2008 at 06:43 PM.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMoo
    Is that SVG crap fixed yet?

    https://bugs.launchpad.net/inkscape/+bug/167335


    Just reminded me of shit with Scribus, they broke their format like three to four times with absolutely useless backward compatibility. Really frigging lame considering it's uses an XML file format which is supposed to circumvent most of these problems. The developers just didn't want the additional legacy baggage

    the scribus file format in general is a seriously lacking work in progress with only backward compatibility between stable versions (and they dont come out that often)

    we had an advantage with inkscape since the project started as an attempt to create an SVG editor.. the web standard format was already there and we made a rule not to deviate from it in any incompatible way.

    as a result i do all my composition in inkscape and migrate each page to scribus only to produce advanced print setting pdfs

    scribus has the challenge of wanting xml but not having a w3c DTP format that could match all its already made features.

    But their svg import is getting better everyday however some things like filters may only ever work in a very limited fashion .. you get that same incomparability between advanced functionality of illustrator and indesign

    All I can say is that InDesign is Industry standard. If something wants to come and take that title away from it (much like InDesign came and took the title away from QuarkXPress), then nice. Otherwise in the Industry I highly recommend whatever the latest Adobe CS package is.
    Industry standard is a funny term. it infers 'the choice of most professionals' without evidence.

    you couldn't commute two and from work in a formula one race car because regular roads would tear it apart.

    Inkscape doesn't really have a target market other than the easy to use for everybody tool. that's much higher priority than marketing to professionals. Even Adobe knows the long tail of creative non-professionals is a larger market than specialist designer they're just unable to commoditize to meet demand without injuring their cash cows.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyFitz
    Industry standard is a funny term. it infers 'the choice of most professionals' without evidence.
    This may be true, (note there is a way in which I agree) but the one which is considered the Industry standard will be the one taught in the Educational institutes, I side note which certainly holds value. At the end of the day the final art piece and how well the printers can handle your file is all that matters, this is the other thing which holds value.

    When I was studying QuarkXPress was still considered the Industry standard even though I myself was dissatisfied with it and used InDesign which became the Industry standard (you can use this term loosely if you choose, it is a term and useful as far as terms go). I would not have been to disappointed if I changed over later, the tools are in enough ways similar (and the short cut keys refreshing because they are the same as the other Adobe programs I know and love).

    There will always be designers who jumped on the new greatest software because anyone else recognises it or the institutes start to teach it. Some of you will find the software doesn't survive and feel you put time into software when you could have been getting better at the one which everyone else was using. Additionally if your preferred software becomes popular (hey, even becomes standard) then you will be pioneers and other designers will look up to you. But at the end of the day if you can catch up and be happy using whatever you use, and the printers will accept your files, it does not matter.

    But as far as recommending to someone wishing to update from a previous standard package, I would recommend the presently standard package (no, I don't work for Adobe.. lol).

  7. #17

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    'free' has a way of getting into educational institutes much faster than disscounted

    not that we're concerned with marketing or uptake.
    refreshingly, we just want better software

    I suggest everyone tries gimp, blender inkscape & scribus on whatever operating system they have. There's no reason why not to.


  8. #18

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    I have tried gimp, gimp may be free but to compare it to photoshop? It just doesn't seem as powerful (although I do see there is a lot you can do in it which are also the fundamentals of photoshop).

    There is a lot of good freeware out there. OpenOffice is a good replacement for Microsoft Office, but if you need all the power of Micrsoft Office and are very familiar with it, you will find OpenOffice falls short. But if you only ever used the basics - Yeh~ Freeware all the way!

    To go any further in this conversation is going to lead to comparisons of features and other silly charts which I am not going to get involved with. I will say this final thing about Education, I have kept it neutral, one side falls on what I have been saying, the other side falls in the positive for Andy and only time will tell.

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyFitz
    'free' has a way of getting into educational institutes much faster than disscounted
    If I were choosing a University where they taught some free software from the Internet, or alternatively something a little expensive which most of the Industry actually uses and is highly respected, I know which one sounds better. That said, what you said is still certainly valid, what you said would start not at the Universities but at the high schools. If the high school students think the software is better then what they eventually use at University then the free stuff will stick - issue is, it has to be better. That is providing they actually continue to study Graphic Art, if they use the free stuff at high school and go onto further education in another field and talk like pros using the stuff the pros do not use, then this creates only a nice piece of software for armatures. Like I said, time will tell, I am just letting the ball bounce where it will.

    Actually my idea for pushing the free stuff into the high schools might be a smart idea. So interesting though, it is free, no-one is paid to go and tell the schools to use it *lol*. Just some guy says, 'hey it's cool' - which is a good thing, but not as nice as someone in a suit coming and sitting down with the I.T. department.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by dean-dzai
    wall of text
    Someone doesn't get it. Make sure RMS doesn't here you say freeware.

    Anyway, if you are on Windows try Paint.NET instead of Gimp, it's a bit easier to use.

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