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Where not to buy Camera's

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  1. #41

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    I strongly support your sentiments. I have a feeling that you will fail in HK, not because you are wrong but because HK has such pathetically weak consumer laws. However, good luck and let us know if you get anywhere. If more people fought back against these shoddy business practises, which ARE ILLEGAL in most other civilised countries, then HK would have a better name for electrical goods among tourists who are generally the ones most often ripped off!


  2. #42

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    Min07, while I don't dispute that selling something for way over the market price is unethical I can't see how (or indeed why) it should be illegal. A fundamental principle of law in most countries is "caveat emptor" (buyer beware).

    Can you point me to a specific law in any country which somehow imposes a maximum price on what something can be sold for?


  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruthless
    Really?! Where are these second hand camera shops? Will I get a good DSLR with live view?

    I am looking for the Canon 1000D. For a new one, I got a price of $3250 in one shop (only in store warranty). If I add the 50mm F1.8 lens, its $620. Is that a good price for an item with "in store warranty"?
    No you probably won't get a DSLR in the second hand camera shops in TST, they mostly sell film bodies and lenses. There are one or two places (mostly in the computer malls) that sell second-hand digital gear but digital bodies depreciate in value so quickly not many shops will bother with second hand digital stuff. For second-hand digital you probably need to go direct to the seller online through sites like DCFever.

    I have no idea of the price of a 1000D but the price you quote for the lens sounds pretty much like normal street price for a Canon 50 F1.8.

    You can get an idea of street prices here:

    http://www.ygdragon.net/index.php?pa...ameraprice.htm

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by PDLM
    Min07, while I don't dispute that selling something for way over the market price is unethical I can't see how (or indeed why) it should be illegal. A fundamental principle of law in most countries is "caveat emptor" (buyer beware).

    Can you point me to a specific law in any country which somehow imposes a maximum price on what something can be sold for?
    See http://www.oft.gov.uk/shared_oft/bus...ral/oft911.pdf . Page 17 seems to be what I was referring to.

  5. #45

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    If the retailer didn't withhold information (i.e. he answered all the customer's questions truthfully to the best of his knowledge) and didn't coerce the customer into making the purchase then I don't see how what the previous poster described contradicts the document you linked.

    It is the essence of any profitable business to charge the customer as much as possible and pay the supplier as little as possible. The difference is your profit. Maximising your profit is the primary objective of all commercial businesses.


  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by PDLM
    If the retailer didn't withhold information (i.e. he answered all the customer's questions truthfully to the best of his knowledge) and didn't coerce the customer into making the purchase then I don't see how what the previous poster described contradicts the document you linked.

    It is the essence of any profitable business to charge the customer as much as possible and pay the supplier as little as possible. The difference is your profit. Maximising your profit is the primary objective of all commercial businesses.
    What about this:

    prohibitions of misleading and aggressive practices.
    Examples include withholding material information from
    consumers so as to impair their ability to make an informed
    choice, or coercing a consumer into making a decision

    Where the word material information was BOLD and I think the material information in this case is the regular price of the item! I know there are laws pertaining to price gouging (raising prices) in Aus, I think, and anti-competition laws in most countries relate to raising prices above the competitive level through use of anti-competitive practises - this is not exactly what is being done here but it is a clear example where "charge as much as you can get away with" is clearly illegal. For example, Australian Competition Law; Singapore Competition Law, UK Competition Law etc etc.

  7. #47

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    More...

    The main protections in the UK come from the obligation to show prices

    Price Marking Order 2004

    This requires traders to display the selling price of goods to consumers, except:

    * goods which are supplied as part of a service;
    * sales by auction or sales of art and antiques;
    * products sold from bulk; or
    * advertisements for goods.

    The selling price should be:

    * inclusive of VAT;
    * unambiguous, easily identifiable and clearly legible;
    * close to the goods or, in the case of distance contracts or advertisements, close to a visual or written description; and
    * available to consumers without them having to ask for it.

    In general, a trader must show the unit price of goods sold in bulk. This is where the goods are weighed and measured for the consumer, such as fruit and vegetables, and for pre-packed goods marked with a quantity or made up in a prescribed quantity.

    Plus the obligation to not mislead on pricing (ie sell at the price indicated). I do not know if HK has price marking laws (very much doubt it) but without the requirement to indicate a price it is hard for consumers to protect themselves again people who just make the price up as they go along.....


  8. #48

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    Thanks - I'll add that to the list of reasons while I won't be returning to the nanny state that the UK has become.

    How does this law allow airlines that sell the same seat on their plane for prices that vary by orders of magnitude?


  9. #49

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    I think you (deliberately) miss the point. They can't (and don't) sell the same product at different prices at the same time - they sell different products (a mixture of seat plus services to change seat etc) at the same time or same product at different times - which provided the price is posted is fine.


  10. #50

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    Presumably negotiating a discount is fine?

    So all the camera shops have to do is to post a price of, say, HK$1M on every item.

    However you phrase it, trying to use the law to disrupt a free negotiation of price is wrong, in my opinion.


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