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Will low cost automation make a big impact?

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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by East_coast
    I suspect it will be linked to your insurance premium. Pay an extra annual fee

    US1K - Super protection - Give you priority in most accidents
    US10K - Ultra protection - Advanced algorithms to keep your family as the top priority
    Naaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah. Zero chance of regulators going for something like this.
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  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit
    Naaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah. Zero chance of regulators going for something like this.
    Probably not but car companies will succeed or fail based on crash stats. You will pay a premium for better software regardless.

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by East_coast
    I guess it is not the case of it happening as we all know it does. It is whether a giant leap will happen. In the last 20 years it has been globalisation and e-tailing that have changed the way of the world.

    Much like the great depression happened after traditional 'local' jobs were replaced by it being done more efficiently elsewhere and cheaply transported to you. A radical shift not a continuous progression.
    Yeah, let's rewrite history to support my doomsday scenario. Let's ignore financial speculation, lack of regulation, and macroeconomic mistakes.

    Get a grip guys. Every few years they announce a revolution in tech. 3 years ago it was all about IOT, 3 years before that Cloud. Now it's AI. When one really understands the technology involved, one understands that it's all just a steady progression. Nothing revolutionary here. Of course, the PR machine of the industry will pretend it is. Makes for good clickbait.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by East_coast
    Probably not but car companies will succeed or fail based on crash stats. You will pay a premium for better software regardless.
    Possibly, yep. I would think there would be some minimum safety threshold, which cars have to pass before being allowed to be driven at "level 5" automation - hands off driving at all times. Once cars have passed this threshold the public can buy them - and anything over and above this will be a selling point for that manufacturer/model.

    I would anticipate all crash data being provided centrally - V2X communications will be ubiquitous and there should be some central repository which can be sliced and diced by all interested parties - manufacturers, consumers, regulators..
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  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by civil_servant
    Yeah, let's rewrite history to support my doomsday scenario. Let's ignore financial speculation, lack of regulation, and macroeconomic mistakes.

    Get a grip guys. Every few years they announce a revolution in tech. 3 years ago it was all about IOT, 3 years before that Cloud. Now it's AI. When one really understands the technology involved, one understands that it's all just a steady progression. Nothing revolutionary here. Of course, the PR machine of the industry will pretend it is. Makes for good clickbait.
    You are mentioning tools that are really just cogs in the system not the solution. It is how society uses those tools that matter.

    Do I think the last 10 years have seen a significant shift in the way we live - Yes.

    Farming and Manufacturing that were once labor intensive have shedded jobs in the west and to some degree in the rest of the world.

    White collar jobs could be next. But you are probably right the world is agile enough now to cope with rapid changes.

  6. #46

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    I would anticipate all crash data being provided centrally - V2X communications will be ubiquitous and there should be some central repository which can be sliced and diced by all interested parties - manufacturers, consumers, regulators..
    Can you imagine premiums going up in HK if they factored in automated records like "Did not signal lane change".
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  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit
    I would anticipate all crash data being provided centrally - V2X communications will be ubiquitous and there should be some central repository which can be sliced and diced by all interested parties - manufacturers, consumers, regulators..
    you would hope. Obviously not in HK until 2047

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by East_coast
    Farming and Manufacturing that were once labor intensive have shedded jobs in the west and to some degree in the rest of the world.
    Yes, and due the recent crackdown on illegal immigration in the US, the farming sector is struggling to find people even though wages are rising. That in itself should tell you something.

    Wages rise on California farms. Americans still dont want the job - Los Angeles Times

    Quote Originally Posted by East_coast
    Do I think the last 10 years have seen a significant shift in the way we live - Yes.
    I don't think so. The impact of earlier inventions, refrigerator, mass-production of cars, airplanes, washing machine, telephone, TV, gas stove, etc, had a much greater impact on every day's life than we witness in today's technologies. We've basically just gained some efficiencies in communications in recent years due to the Internet, but every day life isn't that much different from our parent's generation.
    Last edited by civil_servant; 29-05-2017 at 10:09 AM.

  9. #49

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    I'm in a knowledge industry that has a high potential to be automated. Loads of data checking, data processing.
    Back in 2010 I thought that the industry would be fully automated by 2015.

    Based on the sheer incompetency of the multiple different programmers who have tried to automate things, I now predict no progress on this for another 20 years.

    The demand for automation is there. The competency on creating machine learning algos that do that job is too concentrated in a few firms. Things will change but the pace will be slow enough to cope with.


  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by civil_servant
    Yes, and due the recent crackdown on illegal immigration in the US, the farming sector is struggling to find people even though wages are rising. That in itself should tell you something.
    As the article states unfettered immigration from a poor economy to a rich economy suppresses grass roots wages and innovation.

    Quote Originally Posted by civil_servant
    I don't think so. The impact of earlier inventions, refrigerator, mass-production of cars, airplanes, washing machine, telephone, TV, gas stove, etc, had a much greater impact on every day's life than we witness in today's technologies. We've basically just gained some efficiencies in communications in recent years due to the Internet, but every day life isn't that much different from our parent's generation.
    You are right. I could give up the internet but not my domestic appliances. I would argue that the adoption was reasonably fast but the social norms took a while to change -
    allowing both people in a marriage to enter the workforce.

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