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Need a small amplifier device

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  1. #21

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    Quote Original Post:
    Thanks. Yes my model is 32? as well, I believe.
    Can you just clarify, which model you have ? I cannot find an A6 on Amazon, nor on Fiio's website. You mean A5 ?
    My apologies, bit jetlagged after flight to US. It's an A3

  2. #22

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    Quote Original Post:
    I use a CEntrance DAC/amp for my computer to my headphones. The take the raw files and apply the D/A conversion which is better than the computer's built in DAC. It is small enough - size of a tictac container and light. Goes for about USD99.
    ...cough... snake oil... cough

    Seriously, if you could rig up a blind A/B switch with each source at exactly the same volume, I guarantee you could not tell the difference.
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  3. #23

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    Depends on the headphones you're driving, and the source. Certain high end headphones (fancier Beyerdynamics models) do indeed need the amplication from certain sources. In this case, since OP has impaired hearing, it would help drive his headphones harder, but whether or not they'd be driven too hard at high volume is a concern since the drivers would get wrecked if pushed too hard!


  4. #24

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    Quote Original Post:
    In this case, since OP has impaired hearing
    You misunderstood what I'm trying to achieve, my hearing is fine. My instrument is an electronic drum kit: the sound of the sticks when beating on the pads is a little too loud even with noise cancellation in the headset. It wouldn't be a problem if it was realistic, unfortunately it is not so I'd rather have it covered. A few more db in the headset should achieve this. I'm not worried about damaging my headset. The output signal of the kit is a little too weak for its purpose.

    @Edwardstorm, ok thanks for clarifying, and this is the model I ordered in the end.
    Last edited by jrkob; 18-09-2017 at 07:56 AM.

  5. #25
    jgl
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    Quote Original Post:
    ...cough... snake oil... cough

    Seriously, if you could rig up a blind A/B switch with each source at exactly the same volume, I guarantee you could not tell the difference.
    Most motherboards have really poor, or no, shielding around the audio circuitry. I can certainly tell the difference with an external DAC- for a start, I don't get electronic interference noises through my headphones anymore.

    I can also tell a qualitative difference, but rigging up an ABX testing environment would be prohibitively expensive and time consuming (try to design a protocol around this and you will quickly realise why).
    imparanoic likes this.

  6. #26

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    Quote Original Post:
    rigging up an ABX testing environment would be prohibitively expensive and time consuming (try to design a protocol around this and you will quickly realise why).
    That's why there are terabytes of discussions about this subject - nobody really knows! The human brain simply cannot remember what you heard well enough to know if what you are hearing now sounds "better" than what you heard 10 seconds ago. That's why we need to rely on other "evidence", like price and aesthetics.

  7. #27
    jgl
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    Quote Original Post:
    That's why there are terabytes of discussions about this subject - nobody really knows! The human brain simply cannot remember what you heard well enough to know if what you are hearing now sounds "better" than what you heard 10 seconds ago. That's why we need to rely on other "evidence", like price and aesthetics.
    I would certainly like to think that musicians, at the very least, can remember what something sounded like ten seconds ago.
    imparanoic likes this.

  8. #28

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    Quote Original Post:
    You misunderstood what I'm trying to achieve, my hearing is fine. My instrument is an electronic drum kit: the sound of the sticks when beating on the pads is a little too loud even with noise cancellation in the headset. It wouldn't be a problem if it was realistic, unfortunately it is not so I'd rather have it covered. A few more db in the headset should achieve this. I'm not worried about damaging my headset. The output signal of the kit is a little too weak for its purpose.

    @Edwardstorm, ok thanks for clarifying, and this is the model I ordered in the end.
    I didn't realise you played drums!

    I had exactly the same situation as you. Get a pair of closed headphones. They work perfectly. I had a pair of AKG K271 and they worked great. Not too expensive either.

    Also you might want to try running your kit through a laptop with a MIDI adaptor and using software like EzDrummer to generate the sound. They record samples of different drums at different velocities from multiple mic positions and it sounds far better than the synthesized stuff coming out of your electronic drum brain.
    imparanoic likes this.

  9. #29

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    I changed headsets recently and was suprised at how much louder the new ones sounded. These were both in ear bud type headsets nothing special no amplification. Actually on the older headset I did buy a separate amplifier, with the new headset no need for it. So might be worth a try to go to a store and plug in different earsets and/or headphones to see if one gets you the volume you want without having to purchase an amplifier.

    jayinhongkong likes this.

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