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Solar power system on village house

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  1. #41

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    when will ikea hk sell solar panels and installation packages? if they are considering, hopefully they will create more competitive price than CLP and HKE

    https://www.ikea.com/gb/en/ikea/solar-panels/

    Titus likes this.

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    I'm pretty dubious about this. Defective cells can be replaced, yes - but the cells will all degrade over time. The smart charging system helps protect lifespan somewhat but this is going to be a massive money pit for Tesla.
    It will depend I think on their actual performance and the falling price of batteries. They showed tests in the presentation which highlighted that cells do last 10 years on a once a day charging cycle (which is normal for solar). They were guaranteeing longer than 10 years with the replacement programme. Basically using falling costs and time value of money to justify it. Hard to say how silly the idea is - if it brings revenue forward and allows more R&D to allow better performance and lower cost, plus kickstart an industry that they are in the middle of. May be a risk worth taking.

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by imparanoic:
    when will ikea hk sell solar panels and installation packages? if they are considering, hopefully they will create more competitive price than CLP and HKE

    https://www.ikea.com/gb/en/ikea/solar-panels/
    You can already buy kits like this. Plug and play, with simple connectors and include some lights. However, they are mainly designed for basic rural electrification - the ones I have seen are perhaps 100W max, with more like 30W or 50W common. The 30W system support 3 LED lights, 1 radio and a phone charger. The 50W adds a small DC low power TV to the mix. None of this is good for the type of systems we have (my SMALL system is 1270W, for example, and won't run an air conditioner or run the toaster and the kettle at the same time!).

    I think it will come. But electricity kills if done wrong, and the higher power systems are much more dangerous if done poorly.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by HK_Katherine:
    You can already buy kits like this. Plug and play, with simple connectors and include some lights. However, they are mainly designed for basic rural electrification - the ones I have seen are perhaps 100W max, with more like 30W or 50W common. The 30W system support 3 LED lights, 1 radio and a phone charger. The 50W adds a small DC low power TV to the mix. None of this is good for the type of systems we have (my SMALL system is 1270W, for example, and won't run an air conditioner or run the toaster and the kettle at the same time!).

    I think it will come. But electricity kills if done wrong, and the higher power systems are much more dangerous if done poorly.
    Ikea solar panels is not plug in and play, it designed to supplement or replace the electric supply, just like CLP and HKE HK$100k solution but at half of the price

  5. #45

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    Hi, we are looking to join the solar community, but need a contractor. Any suggestions?
    I dont want to pay someone to learn, I would rather get someone that knows what they are doing.Thanks

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  6. #46
    Kiz
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    We got solar panels on our roof linked up to CLP very recently, we are still waiting for final sign off from EMSD and it's been great.

    The change in the regulations so that the solar panels can cover 50% of a village house roof with a maximum clearance of 2.5m (essentially a legal waterproof canopy over 50% of your roof, rather than lying on the floor making the roof unusable as before) and the good FiT(feed in tariff rate of $5) has meant a significant increase in recent applications. So the CLP process is a bit backlogged, took I think 2 months from when our solar panels were up until CLP installed the Smartmeter etc. Apparently they are hiring more people to help but not sure when that will make a difference, so you might have some delays between installation and actually getting hooked up to the grid like us.

    The contract we have with CLP is 15 years with the $5 FiT rate, and the solar panels are also guaranteed for 15 years. Was relatively expensive to install, approx 150,000, but it should take 4 years to recover costs and then you have 11 years pure profit at the guaranteed rate. (Incidentally the highest FiT rate in the world at the moment).

    The contractor we used did a really good job of the construction, a bit useless at keeping us up to date with the timeline change, but overall fairly responsive etc by whatsapp. They did everything from start to hopefully the finish, with EMSD in the next few days so that has been super simple.

    Anyway, drop me a PM if you want the contractors details and have any questions. We are also in Lantau (I'm assuming by your name you are too).


  7. #47

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    Hi everyone. I have been reading these posts with great interest. Can anyone advise the best type of batteries for a small off grid solar system (i.e. for my my home office with no heavy requirements like air con), and where/how to buy them in HK? Much appreciated.


  8. #48

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    This company appears to be UK ikea's supplier for their solar panels, interesting that they have HK office as well, wonder if they sell directly to consumers or even advise their approved contractors

    太陽能屋頂系列 - 漢能薄膜發電集團


  9. #49

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    I’m interested in installing solar panels for my village house.

    The initial installation charge of $150,000 is quite expensive...

    Does anyone have any figures of how much electricity they use and how much is sold back to CLP?

    Are the annual FiT earnings of $15,000 realistic?

    Are there any maintenance issues?

    How often do you need to clean the solar panels?

    Any issues with the inverter?

    Thanks


  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by ArrynField:
    I’m interested in installing solar panels for my village house.

    The initial installation charge of $150,000 is quite expensive...

    Does anyone have any figures of how much electricity they use and how much is sold back to CLP?

    Are the annual FiT earnings of $15,000 realistic?

    Are there any maintenance issues?

    How often do you need to clean the solar panels?

    Any issues with the inverter?

    Thanks
    That doesn't sound right. The CLP FIT is the highest in the world and gives a payback period of under 5 years (yours implies at least 10). Shop around for a better deal. When looking at the price, check the components. The panels should be a very small proportion of the cost these days, the inverter the most expensive piece of equipment and labour to install around 30% of the total. If any of these don't line up you have a problem.

    The amount of power you generate will depend on your roof angle / direction and shading. If you are under a tree facing north, a lot less than in the open facing south.

    You should clean them probably once a week in HK. Although I regularly forget to clean mine!

    LG is the best quality inverter on the market at the moment and inverter quality can be quite variable. Panel quality has got pretty standardised these days. Worry about inverter brand but just choose the cheapest panels.
    ArrynField likes this.

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