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SLR Camera lens cleaning shop.

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  1. #11

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    Desiccant packs in airtight boxes sounds like exactly what my camera lenses need. I'm going to do exactly that. I'll still see if vacuum boxes are affordable. Don't wanna be penny wise and pound foolish. The vacuum cabinets should last a good 10 years or more.
    I truly appreciate all the tips and advice, folks! SLR camera's have become affordable but lenses have remained expensive as ever. Of course, lenses now have built-in stabilization, something unheard of just not too long ago.
    My photography is semi-professional. I shoot mostly empty sites for property development, then composite 3D buildings into the sites. As a hobby, I like shooting photos of festivals as they are always colorful and have lots of people in it. That's where a zoom is handy as I don't have to get too close as some people don't like it.

    Last edited by ronnie yeoh; 28-04-2010 at 12:45 PM.

  2. #12
    jgl
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    How do those small cabinet units work anyway, the ones that you plug into a wall socket- are they vacuum based or do they use heat?


  3. #13

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    It's airtight, and there's a pump to remove all the air in it. No air, no mold or dust. I googled for it.


  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl
    How do those small cabinet units work anyway, the ones that you plug into a wall socket- are they vacuum based or do they use heat?
    neither. from my understanding (and i could be wrong) the simple units use a chemical dessicant to absorb water vapour from inside the cabinet. the drying unit then closes some valves, and the dessicant is heated, which causes the water to evaporate again, but to the outside. once this is done the valves are closed again, and the dessicant is exposed to the cabinet again. apparently the dessicant never needs replacing and the cycle can be repeated endlessly. the units run on about 5-10 watts.

    they do end up causing a slight vacuum, as the water vapour is removed from the air, thus the volume of the air inside is less than it was when you shut the sealed door.

    they are quite effective and can get the humidity down to 20% even if ambient is 90%
    jgl likes this.

  5. #15
    jgl
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    Thanks for that. I tried a quick Google and just got a slew of sales pages. What you described makes sense from what I understand of chemical dessicants, and it's a much more elegant solution to continually running a compressor or pumping heat into a box.


  6. #16

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    I'll have to get the airtight boxes. Each lens costs way more than the box. And some lenses cost more than the camera. The moldy parts of the lens generates some blurry edges in my photos. And I also lose some contrast especially around the perimeter of the photos.


  7. #17

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    Ronny, did you get the lens cleaned?

    I just remembered a store i went to years ago to get a camera cleaned... Panda Camera Service. Double Building, 22 Stanley St.

    can't remember what floor..top floor maybe? dunno.

    I actually just did a big back-flip on the dehumdifiers...

    basically, to keep my room from going too dry the humidity can't be less than 50%-ish or it gets too dry to breath in there. i carry my gear for 12hrs a day, atleast 6 days a week (don't ask why!). i did get a little worried that sitting at high humidity all day and then at 50-60% humidity at night might not be enough to reduce growth of fungus, so now i stick them in a drying cabinet set at 38-40%RH. hopefully that will dry the gear out without perishing the rubber/plastic.

    i think if you only use your gear once a week, and you keep it at 60% (in a sealed box or in a room with a dehumidifier) that is fine.

    The cabinet i bought cost me about $600, but i have seen the same things on apliu st for $450. yes, more expensive than a plastic box with a dessicant, but these cabinets in theory should last a number of years. i still reckon if you don't take your gear out everyday this cabinet is a waste of money...


  8. #18

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    go to nikon cs if it's nikkor


  9. #19

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    [QUOTE=ronnie yeoh;602367]As a hobby, I like shooting photos of festivals as they are always colorful and have lots of people in it. That's where a zoom is handy as I don't have to get too close as some people don't like it.[/QUOTE

    On a side note, if you do send your tele in for repair take the opportunity to try to overcome your aversion to using a short lens for street photgraphy, chances are you'll take much better shots if you do.


  10. #20

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    Thanks for the tip! Would like to have some tips on shooting skyscrapers at night.
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