Like Tree1Likes

How to configure PC for new Hard Disk

Reply
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Lantau
    Posts
    1,519

    How to configure PC for new Hard Disk

    My daughter's OLD desktop PC broke down suffering a hard disk failure.

    It really is an OLD machine - PIII 500MHz, but she was happy enough using it for websurfing and and odd document for her homework.

    I am looking to replace it but was wondering if anyone can advise - as much out of curiosity as anything.

    I received a HDD failure message on boot up. I have a spare PATA HDD lying around so I took the dead HDD out and put the new one in.

    It won't boot now. I have put a Win XP CD in the drive. It boots from that but doesn't get very far. I think the new HDD isn't being recognised.

    How to I get the new HDD to work? It doesn't auto detect. The old HDD was 16Gb (yep, told you it was old) and the new one 320Gb. I am guessing the BIOS can't recognise such a comparatively large disk.

    Is there something I can do in the BIOS to get it working? If not, time for the scrapyard.

    Thanks


  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,223

    Flash update the motherboard BIOS maybe. Check it out on the manufacturers website and see if there is an update that would allow it to support the new hard drive. If you post the make/model up here I am sure others can help!

    HKNewBi likes this.

  3. #3
    jgl
    jgl is offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    10,234

    Definitely try Geoff's suggestion first- firmware updates are always one of the first things to try with something like this.

    If that doesn't work: This is dredging up some ancient history, but iirc if you cannot autodetect hard drive settings, you can manually enter them in BIOS. They don't have to be correct, they just have to multiply out to less than your total disk size. As long as you don't put in crazy-out-of-scope figures, your mobo and drive should translate this into something workable.

    You could, for instance, try entering the sector/head/cylinder numbers for the 16GB drive in BIOS but connect the 320 drive and see if it works. If it does, great. Sure, you are only using 5% of the drive, but at least you can use the computer again. If it works, start increasing parameters to see if you get more accessable drive space.

    Cylinder-head-sector - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    And this to calculate values: http://www.csgnetwork.com/mediasizecalc.html

    One other thing that occurs to me is to check whether there is a jumper on your 320 that sets it to slave mode. Unlikely, but worth checking.

    Last edited by jgl; 17-06-2010 at 11:32 AM.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    98

    Either the BIOS does not recognized the drive or the new hard drive is probably not compatible with the old desk top, which has IDE interfaces instead of PATA, you need to get check the mother board or do some research on the google.


  5. #5
    jgl
    jgl is offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    10,234

    I'm pretty sure that IDE is the same thing as PATA. At least, that's what the Google says.


  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Lantau
    Posts
    1,519

    Yes, PATA is the 'new' name for IDE. A bacronym from when SATA appeared on the scene.

    Thanks for all the advice. One problem as I see it with flashing the BIOS is that I would need to put the update on a floppy disk? This is my only machine with a 1.44Mb floppy.

    It is a 10 year old Compaq PIII, 500Mhz.

    I'll put the new HDD back in and make a note of what comes up. I tried manually putting in the HDD settings but it was coming up with questions I have never heard of.

    If memory serves, the first question was something like 'boot mode' and the default answer was 'PXE'!

    If I can't get it working, well no big deal, it has more than done its time. But would be satisfying and worthwhile if it was simply a case of changing some settings in the BIOS.

    Thanks again everyone!


  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,223
    Quote Originally Posted by HKNewBi
    It is a 10 year old Compaq PIII, 500Mhz.
    I would just toss it then!

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Lantau
    Posts
    1,519

    That is the plan. But if it can give 2 more weeks service whilst I get round to getting a Dell installed why not do it.

    And doesn't hurt from an education point of view.


  9. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Tin Shui Wai
    Posts
    660

    PIII what OS are you running?
    Win 98 / 98SE wont accept larger than 127gb disks.
    Any larger than that and you will need to partition the disk into smaller chunks.


  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    new territories, hong kong
    Posts
    28

    the OP mentioned - it is an OLD computer running on a P3 500MHz, as with most modern software the OLD computer will struggle:
    1. to run on 500MHz (as most modern CPU is running at 3GHZ),
    2. the size of the hard disk (probably small : heaving at the seams) to store data (as most modern computer has 500G),
    3. the size of the RAM (small) will be slow for memeory access (as most modern computer will have 4 GB)

    it is good to save money, but in this case the best solution is to get a new computer.

    the costs to repair the OLD computer with parts and labour is pretty close to a new computer.

    the benefits are clear.

    with a new computer; all the modern softwares are usable, the speed will be faster and the hard disk can store more data than previously, and the speed from a new computer is faster than a P3 500MHz computer.

    the hassles of more problems going out from the OLD computer: hard disk size, RAM, CPU speed are bound to come up from time to time.

    and finally, if the OP do decide to repair the OLD computer, how long can the OLD computer lasts?

    as there are more and more modern softwares on the markets, will the OLD computer still become compatible?

    the OP may replace the hard disk, but the OLD computer CPU and its motherboard is not recognising the new hard disk.

    the OP may change the BIOS setting and if it does work.....in the short term the OLD computer may pod along...but for how long?

    technology has moved on.

    as for the OS, the OLD computer being a P3, can run on windows 98 (11years ago) but only just because it is the maximum level a P3 can run up to.
    as for any OS newer(Vista, window7), the P3 will struggle to start

    just get a new computer and forget about all the problems...it is just not worth wasting time and money fixing a OLD computer.

    i hope this has help.


Reply
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast