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Google X TP-LINK products OnHub Router TGR1900

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  1. #11

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    Do more ... but as long as they're not legacy devices like Rasperry Pi / NAS server etc which perform best over LAN connections. But then in Google's world, the NAS is the google drive and their media center is YouTUbe / Chromecast.


  2. #12

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    From TP-LInk web site

    A dedicated antenna and radio scans the environment every five minutes, and OnHub switches to a less crowded channel if it will improve your Wi-Fi performance. OnHub makes the switch when you’re not using the Internet so it doesn’t interrupt what you’re doing.
    Most likely there is always at least one device connected to the router. Does it mean the router will never automatically switch channel? Or is there difference between 'using the Internet' with 'connected to the router'?

  3. #13
    jgl
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    Quote Originally Posted by robertlempriere:
    Agreed, HK is more constrained by concrete and steel than distance when it comes to wifi

    This Hub device though.. I have a feeling it is going to be central to Google's vision of the IoT (Internet of Things) - think, networked Aircon, humidity monitoring, security monitoring, electricity monitoring etc etc

    I expect the connected home of the future will have some such Hub to which all the IoT devices connect and are controlled/monitored by

    I don't think Google's game here is to improve your wifi signal, but to enable your network to do more (I should be in Marketing)

    Hum, you are probably correct. But that turns the device from an interesting high spec router into something much worse.

    I am dreading the era where the IoT is a reality. Just cannot understand how people think it's a good thing given how hard it is to secure computers and smartphones, which are much more tightly controlled than the zillion manufacturers of household appliances.

    Security researchers hack a car and apply the brakes via text | Technology | The Guardian
    Remote Hacking and the Vulnerabilities of Today’s Medical Devices | UM Center for Health and Homeland Security

  4. #14
    jgl
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    Your devices autoswitch channels to follow SSIDs. Your smartphone probably does this all the time if you're using wifi in a non-tiny office or on a public network.

    If you are browsing, you will never notice a change of channel.

    I'm not sure how this works with other situations (e.g. VPN sessions) though... not something I've ever looked into.


  5. #15

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    It does sort of seem like a device which is going to have to prove itself - to show that there's a good reason for it to exist at a relatively high price... Of course, it's US-only (at this point), and that'll make it much easier for them, since USians are used to being shafted by their ISPs on things like that.


  6. #16

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    It's all very well the manufacturers shout to the populace about the "goodness" of this device.... BUT .... who's seen "a" mode on a recent Laptop / Netbook in RECENT times??

    I've only ever had it on a - by now - quite ancient IBM T60p which I sold recently.

    In ALL the Laptops & Netbooks through my den since buying the T60p - I've NEVER had any other portable with "a" mode built in!!

    The IBM T60p was under-resourced - the wretched thing only went up to Channel ELEVEN whereas most of my several routers could be set up to Channel 14 - NOT that I wanted to use that Jap "b" mode allocation!

    I've a couple of Routers that will operate on the "a" band (5GHz) - but - since selling my IBM T60p - they have NOTHING to "talk to".




  7. #17
    jgl
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenCatalonia:

    It's all very well the manufacturers shout to the populace about the "goodness" of this device.... BUT .... who's seen "a" mode on a recent Laptop / Netbook in RECENT times??

    I've only ever had it on a - by now - quite ancient IBM T60p which I sold recently.

    In ALL the Laptops & Netbooks through my den since buying the T60p - I've NEVER had any other portable with "a" mode built in!!

    <snip>

    What does 802.11a have to do with *anything* here?

    Practically all home wifi APs support 11a, doesn't mean that you have to use it. Same way all wired neworking devices support FastEthernet when everyone uses gig speeds.

    Maybe you shouldn't have sold the T60 just so you could be happy using protocol that fell out of common usage over a decade ago.
    shri likes this.

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