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When did they introduce mobile phone signals in the MTR?

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  1. #21

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    surely NYC should get electronic payment as a higher priority than mobile phones?


  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by megatronic
    The subway is one of the few places in NYC where you can get away from loudmouths on their mobiles. People talk, read books, listen to music. I've always thought the lack of phone signals was a good thing. When I lived there, I liked to try to listen for the mood of the train car: on Friday afternoons/evening and before holidays, people were usually chatty and lively; heavy silence on Monday mornings; general happiness after sports championships; combination of stress and holiday mood around Xmas.
    i'm the complete opposite. would prefer if nyc subways have wireless signal. often times the trains are late/delayed, so would be helpful if i can let coworkers know i'll be late coming in. also, good for emergencies - never know when another nyc subway platform pushing incident happens again.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by megatronic
    The subway is one of the few places in NYC where you can get away from loudmouths on their mobiles. People talk, read books, listen to music.
    That may be the case in New York, but in the MTR I've rarely been disturbed by any such "loudmouths". I don't like talking on the MTR and usually ignore any calls I do get. But I do send plenty of texts and emails--all of which would be stopped if mobile service were terminated. Most people on the MTR seem to be buried in their smartphones, either playing games, listening to music or watching videos of some kind (possibly streaming?) Those who aren't allegedly frotteuring their fellow passengers, that is...

  4. #24

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    Actually, CSL were first ~July 1993 on their own designed system, called the 1LCX (the 1 Leaky Coax for obvious reasons) covering from Central to Causeway and up to Mongkok. Smartone were the first 2G network to launch in Hong Kong (March 1993) and the second to enter the MTR later that year... Smartone piggy backed on the CSL system. It didn't work because the 1LCX was a shite design and full of interference due to incompetence, it was under-designed, under spec'd,they over-claimed perf etc etc. So it didn't work. It was an epic fail when Smartone joined.

    The MTR then saw the obvious money making potential of doing it right and bought out CSL and called in the experts to redesign the system to support all operators - this was the 2LCX (it had two coaxes).

    The window of opportunity to do these fantastically expensive installations (e.g. in London and elsewhere) is closing if not closed already. Earlier it could be done before because more coverage = move calls = more money. That is not the case now as we all get included voice >1000mins and >GB data plans, so the operators won't make any more money from providing more coverage (they've already got £19.99 per month or whatever), so they have no incentive to improve coverage. London's Luddite cultural and technical difficulties aside, I don't see it happening in London ever - poxy Wifi on a handful of platforms doesn't count - but is probably sufficient to send a email/text and further kills any additional revenue opportunity of covering the tunnels/everything. Who the fuck would want to deal with the LU management and lazy transport workers and unions - not to mention the fuckwit politicians claiming it will be only used to detonate bombs by terrorists... sadly it was demonstrated that there is more than one way to skin a cat, in that case. Phone coverage in the London Underground will never happen.

    As for interference devices... apart from being very illegal almost everywhere. I'm not sure they will work, because the phones nowadays operate on 3 or 4 frequency bands, and your cheap and cheerful jammer is unlikely to be mil-spec'd to take out all of them. Apart from that be aware that OFCA runs a series of monitoring stations for the very purpose of detecting interference to those companies that have paid billions of dollars for spectrum the companies themselves have similar capability.

    Last edited by zerocred; 11-02-2013 at 11:12 PM.

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