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  • 2 Post By jr_citizen

one2free capped plan is it truely Unlimited internet?

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  1. #1

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    one2free capped plan is it truely Unlimited internet?

    I have recently bought $267 plan with unlimited internet and I was under the impression from the sales rep that it is unlimited can anyone shed a light on this?


  2. #2
    WBC
    WBC is offline

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    its an absolute certainty that there will be some form of fair usage policy


  3. #3

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    Searched on-line the only webpage says it a 4gb allowance a month.

    Thanks WBC anyway.


  4. #4

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    There is a fair usage policy.

    If you go over a certain level, they throttle your speed.


  5. #5

    Join Date
    May 2007
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    I am very interested in this myself, but in looking for answer have just come up with more questions. For all of CSLs attempts at adding some transparency to their "unlimited" plans and their Fair Use policy, their stance still lacks clarity.

    You can read the 1O1O/one2free Fair Use Policy here (this is the link supplied in the one2free online store, in the footer -- see here).

    Where the clarity is lacking is what happens on heavy use:

    • The FUP seems skewed towards P2P users. What it does not explain is what happens for heavy users with legitimate downloads.

    • The policy says that the FUP is applied to both the top 5% of users or those impacting the service of others. What it does not explain is what happens if you are in the top 5% but do not impact the performance of other users. It is also not clear what the policy refers to with regards to impacting other users (on an application level, on a tower basis, on a network level -- and if this is on a per-device or per-account level).

    • As the threshold fluctuates every month, the threshold at which a customer would cross into territory that would result in throttles being placed on their account are a moving target. Even if a customer repeats the same traffic patterns from one month to another, they could find that some months they cross the threshold whereas in other months they do not. Perhaps the benefit here is all to CSL -- it forces account holders to self-censor their usage.

    • There is no explanation if or how an account holder is notified if they are nearing or actually do cross the threshold at which they would have the speed throttling applied to their account.

    • There is no clarity of what level of throttling may be applied.

    • There is no mention of an appeal process or other means to have a service cap reviewed for errors.


    In doing some research online, I found that a number of these points were a result of a OFTA-imposed fine on CSL from May 2010. It appears that CSL introduced a FUP in January with hard numbers that would have answered my concerns above -- but the OFTA felt this was too stringent. As a result, in the following month, CSL revised their FUP to the current, less clear version. Though it seems that the change may have lowered the number of account holders that could cross the FUP limits, it seems that the clarity of how that occurs and what happens as a result in the process was lost.

    I had also found an article where a spokesperson for CSL was quoted to say that they would "work with subscribers" who crossed the threshold -- unfortunately I lost the link. The only thing I could find was this blog post - but that had no one quoted or sources listed.
    BornInPeking and pin like this.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by jr_citizen:
    I am very interested in this myself, but in looking for answer have just come up with more questions. For all of CSLs attempts at adding some transparency to their "unlimited" plans and their Fair Use policy, their stance still lacks clarity.

    You can read the 1O1O/one2free Fair Use Policy here (this is the link supplied in the one2free online store, in the footer -- see here).

    Where the clarity is lacking is what happens on heavy use:
    • The FUP seems skewed towards P2P users. What it does not explain is what happens for heavy users with legitimate downloads.

    • The policy says that the FUP is applied to both the top 5% of users or those impacting the service of others. What it does not explain is what happens if you are in the top 5% but do not impact the performance of other users. It is also not clear what the policy refers to with regards to impacting other users (on an application level, on a tower basis, on a network level -- and if this is on a per-device or per-account level).

    • As the threshold fluctuates every month, the threshold at which a customer would cross into territory that would result in throttles being placed on their account are a moving target. Even if a customer repeats the same traffic patterns from one month to another, they could find that some months they cross the threshold whereas in other months they do not. Perhaps the benefit here is all to CSL -- it forces account holders to self-censor their usage.

    • There is no explanation if or how an account holder is notified if they are nearing or actually do cross the threshold at which they would have the speed throttling applied to their account.

    • There is no clarity of what level of throttling may be applied.

    • There is no mention of an appeal process or other means to have a service cap reviewed for errors.


    In doing some research online, I found that a number of these points were a result of a OFTA-imposed fine on CSL from May 2010. It appears that CSL introduced a FUP in January with hard numbers that would have answered my concerns above -- but the OFTA felt this was too stringent. As a result, in the following month, CSL revised their FUP to the current, less clear version. Though it seems that the change may have lowered the number of account holders that could cross the FUP limits, it seems that the clarity of how that occurs and what happens as a result in the process was lost.

    I had also found an article where a spokesperson for CSL was quoted to say that they would "work with subscribers" who crossed the threshold -- unfortunately I lost the link. The only thing I could find was this blog post - but that had no one quoted or sources listed.
    If you're looking for CSL's policy on cap and how they deal with customers who exceed their allowed data usage, you can always look at their Fair Use Policies.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinko8:
    If you're looking for CSL's policy on cap and how they deal with customers who exceed their allowed data usage, you can always look at their Fair Use Policies.
    Seriously, wtf is up with some of these new posters today??

    I think jr has spelt out quite clearly and in great detail what he/she thinks about CSL's Fair Usage Policy and its lack of clarity.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by pin:
    Seriously, wtf is up with some of these new posters today??

    I think jr has spelt out quite clearly and in great detail what he/she thinks about CSL's Fair Usage Policy and its lack of clarity.
    They secretly work for CSL hehe