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Setting up a coffee shop in HK.

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  1. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by monochrome
    Hong Kong may suck in many ways but it is like NYC.

    Once you get there and you feel the energy you fall in love with it.
    I think Skyhook has been here quite a while and it seems he is now falling out of love with the place
    Cho-man likes this.

  2. #72

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    [QUOTE=monochrome;3314061]

    Quote Originally Posted by Skyhook

    You are advising the OP to set up a trendy tourist trap which views customers as ATM machines, not at all fun.
    Um actually I wasn't, but thanks for taking what I typed out of context.

    Considering my family are heavilly involved in the hospitality industry in Melbourne and to a lesser extent in Europe, I am speaking from experience. I grew up in the industry, thanks to my mothers side of the family. My fathers side were more involved in mechanical, civil and architectural industries..

    I firmly had Melbournes Botanical restaurant and bar, in mind when I typed my licensed venue comment, an example of what I am typically used to/familiar with and prefer. A specialist licensed cafe that adopted a similar format would be very welcome and likely attract a lot more female patrons, which I think is a good thing.

    Not a tourist trap or anything like that, just a more pleasant environment that non beer drinkers can enjoy a good coffee or wine and a light meal etc with some decent indoor and outdoor space to enjoy it in. That's what I meant.

    Restaurant & Bar in South Yarra, Melbourne - The Botanical.
    Last edited by Skyhook; 03-11-2015 at 10:17 AM.

  3. #73

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    Another more casually priced licensed Cafe that's along the same idea as the botanical, would be Airstream Cafe. I regularly visited this place when it first opened back in the mid 90's which is still going strong 2 decades later on its original shop fit, still looks as good today as it did back then. Didn't date.

    A great place again to order Italian based coffees and a light snack, inside or outside on the terrace.
    http://www.airstreamcafe.com.au/

    Never saw any drunken violence at these places btw. and it was always a generally youthful crowd that made these places the success that they are.

    This is what we need more of in Hong Kong, in my opinion.

    Last edited by Skyhook; 03-11-2015 at 11:49 AM.

  4. #74

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    Just walk past this post, couldn't resist injecting a bit of my view on setting up coffee shop.

    To join in a French coffee shop franchise and to bring to Hong Kong will mean you pay dearly for the license free to begin with, likely have to buy in the regional rights to begin with, and pay extra license fee for the first shop. To get a sensible return on investment, one will likely need to find a shop in a more busy district areas in Hong Kong, likely Central, Waichai or TST. Therefore, premium rental fee (killer number 1), AND will need to hire reasonably good English speaking staff (killer number 2). Typical market rental period has turn from 5 years down to 3 years now, a much more ideal term for landlord.

    So assuming one does a wonderful job of operating a coffee shop, real profit will start come in maybe later part of year 2 or early year 3. The landlord will be waiting with a new contract term that will just let you survive, not enough to call a profit, yet maybe a bit more then one will get as salary if taking on a real job. This is the reality of F&B in Hong Kong.

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  5. #75

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    If a giant like Burger King lasts barely a year in wanchai then things are not looking good on the f&b front in HK

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  6. #76

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    The main difference between a Do-Ur-Own coffee shop and a big franchise, other the the big $$$, would be any equity you would achieve from identity/advertising. In the case of a foreign franchise's first entry into a different market/culture, any 'advantage' would be questionable.


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