Reply
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Like Tree12Likes

Coworking space experience

  1. #11
    er2
    er2 is offline

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    1,428
    Quote Originally Posted by jgl
    Huh, the physical security/infosec folks must have had conniptions over the idea of using serviced offices.
    Always appreciate the opportunity to learn new words

    That aside, if Goldman knocks at the door, WeWork falls over backwards to do whatever they ask. Im not even sure if that WeWork has any other tenants left, but I do know that they moved various other companies to other WeWorks to make room for them. If such companies need something - their own IT infrastructure, doors, cameras, safes, whatever - they get it. The community team might send out a lovely cuddly amateurish feel good vibe, but at the back end theyre a property business just like SHK.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    455
    Quote Originally Posted by er2
    .... but at the back end theyre a property business just like SHK.
    Do co-working companies actually own any real estate (or develop it)? I'm happy to be corrected, but I thought they were in the business of leasing premises from landlords and then sub-letting to participants in the gig economy, corporates looking for overflow etc.

    Unless I've misunderstood something, it sounds like a high risk business model to me - when companies start cutting back in the next downturn, they'll be the first ones to lose their tenants.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    2,133
    Quote Originally Posted by traineeinvestor
    Unless I've misunderstood something, it sounds like a high risk business model to me - when companies start cutting back in the next downturn, they'll be the first ones to lose their tenants.
    typically they rent & sub-let the space, they tend to target start-ups, so in theory, would not be impacted by a downturn, IMHO its a fade, lots of coworking spaces around town are closing.
    traineeinvestor likes this.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    926
    Quote Originally Posted by Kowloon Goon
    May need? I recommend doing some research before quitting your job. Marketing skills are not rare in this city. Good luck though.
    hahahhahahaha, Marketing skills is nowhere to be seen here. I would say HK is probably the worst city to find marketing or creative talent in Asia (maybe China is worst). People claim they're social media experts here because they bought 20k followers and use engagement groups. Just look at most marketing campaign here are just so bad, "you should buy our products because we bettah"
    JAherbert likes this.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    570

    You sound jelly. Need a hug?


  6. #16

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    926
    Quote Originally Posted by Kowloon Goon
    You sound jelly. Need a hug?
    i was just addressing your delusional thoughts, only a marketer would offer a hug in response

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    570

    ok, marketer... Have a good day.


  8. #18

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    926
    Quote Originally Posted by Kowloon Goon
    ok, marketer... Have a good day.
    you're definitely not one lol, probably English teacher. I would love to hear your counter argument but you sound like someone who make assumption without having any idea what you're talking about. If you shoot down someone's post then expect to back what you say instead of spewing nonsense.

    As for the OP, just check the coworking space. Wework has the best community, make sure you're not in the building where companies book too many floors otherwise networking will be limited. Don't listen to Kowloon Clown.
    Wong Jeremy likes this.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    ???
    Posts
    25,997
    Quote Originally Posted by traineeinvestor
    Do co-working companies actually own any real estate (or develop it)? I'm happy to be corrected, but I thought they were in the business of leasing premises from landlords and then sub-letting to participants in the gig economy, corporates looking for overflow etc.

    Unless I've misunderstood something, it sounds like a high risk business model to me - when companies start cutting back in the next downturn, they'll be the first ones to lose their tenants.
    A fair few "smaller" co work spaces in Wong Chuk Hang are run by landlords / full floor or building owners who are looking to optimize their yields. A number of people who bought floors in WCH a few years ago (or after SARS) anticipating the MTR line have now turned their spaces into "shared office" spaces.

    We moved offices recently and are renting a dedicated office from a well established company. This one has a 10 year lease on the premises and several floors in a single landlord/owner building. A bulk of their co-work is leased on demand to a couple of large companies and seems like the rest is split between small outfits like us and then desks are taken up by freelancers/startup type companies.

    OP - the benefit of a desk to me is tangible but for many it might be minimal. In our co-work space, they rent desks out, but they're usually empty. People wander in do their work, have a coffee or two and wander back out. We were told that they rent these desks as it allows the renters to use the lounges anywhere in town (in this case about 15-20 of them) for meetings etc.

    A couple of tutors are doing this around town - doing 1-1 tutorial sessions in the co-work space's lounges.

    Also I think the atmosphere at WeWork is quite different from ours which does not hae all the hip benefits other than free coffee.
    Wong Jeremy likes this.
    Have a GeoExpat related problem - please create a support ticket.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    2

    Moved into another one called three commas at wong chuk hang. new opened, less noisy. i think it's a great working place for freelancers. Wong chuk hang gathers a lot of fashion and it techs.


Reply
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2