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MPF management fees

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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    511
    Quote Originally Posted by foxwendal:
    Sure, if you sell at the top of the market and buy back near the bottom you’d be better off. But you’re deluding yourself if you think you can normally pull that off with any consistency
    100%. If you have an MPF, the CAF (DIS) which is 60% equity, 40% bonds is the best default investment if you just want to leave it alone due to the lowest management fees.

    I may take a punt later on though if the market keeps growing and switch to bonds if my magic eightball sees the covid19 vaccine turning people into flesh-eating rage monsters.

    Worst case is I don't make anything.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    216
    Quote Originally Posted by periphery831:
    100%. If you have an MPF, the CAF (DIS) which is 60% equity, 40% bonds is the best default investment if you just want to leave it alone due to the lowest management fees.

    I may take a punt later on though if the market keeps growing and switch to bonds if my magic eightball sees the covid19 vaccine turning people into flesh-eating rage monsters.

    Worst case is I don't make anything.
    Think worst case is you don't make anything and you're then psychologically anchored to not get back into the market until your selling price is breached. I have a retired friend who sold his equities in 2012 at the all time high at the time, certain it was too high and a crash was imminent. In actuality, it never went lower than that point again and to this day hasn't bought back in missing out on massive gains these 8 years.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    511
    Quote Originally Posted by foxwendal:
    Think worst case is you don't make anything and you're then psychologically anchored to not get back into the market until your selling price is breached. I have a retired friend who sold his equities in 2012 at the all time high at the time, certain it was too high and a crash was imminent. In actuality, it never went lower than that point again and to this day hasn't bought back in missing out on massive gains these 8 years.
    Can't see myself personally being anchored, if anything it would give me more impetus to make more money and switch to a more aggressive fund. Always pros and cons.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    511

    Regarding fund switching with Manulife.

    . The above transaction can generally be viewed via "Confirmation of Fund Choice Management" under "Inquiry" section of the menu in 3 dealing days^ after it is submitted and processed. Your e-instruction* received after 4 pm on a dealing day^ will normally be processed on the next dealing day^.

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