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  • 1 Post By Bob Loblaw
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Hiking up Wu Tong Shan in Shenzhen

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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    190

    Hiking up Wu Tong Shan in Shenzhen

    Now that I have my multiple entry China visa, I'd like to go and hike up Wu Tong Shan (Ng Tung Shan) in Shenzhen. Anybody done it?


    I'm planning my route based on this sketch map (!) together with opencyclemap/google maps/baidu maps:

    Hiking Trekking Hong Kong Adventurer, Wu Tong Shan (


    It appears there are at least 5 ways up, in clockwise order:
    - A road from the west side.
    - The red trail on the sketch starting at the same place as the road.
    - Some other red trail from the east.
    - Purple trail referred to as Bi Tong Dao (???) to the south.
    - Purple trail referred to as Ling Yun Dao (???) to the SW.


    I plan to go up one trail and down another, anybody have recommendations for the most scenic/enjoyable routes with manageable logistics? (Yes, I said scenic, but in reality I'm mentally prepared for the circus up there.)


    It appears the path to the south ends close to the Sha Tau Kok border crossing (~3km), though the final road down is probably not very pedestrian friendly. Is it possible to end the hike by just walking to the border and crossing back into HK?


    Thanks!


    Greg


  2. #2

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    190
    I'm sure some of you must have done this...

    Anyway, I think I've convinced myself the best way is actually as described in my original link (or possibly in reverse). Considering each option:
    - The road option is eliminated by default.
    - The path starting from the road is probably the most crowded, so probably not the best way.
    - I'm not totally convinced I can easily find the trailhead on the eastern side and don't want to go on a wild goose chase.
    - Which leaves the two "purple" routes as in the linked site.

    Any thoughts?

    (PS: Actually, the main southern trailhead is actually much closer to the border than I originally thought; it's on Wutong road, just over a km from the border, so I would think quite easy to walk to. There seems to be a second less travelled southern terminus further east.)

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    NT/CUHK
    Posts
    889

    best of luck... i've never been there, so can't give you any specific advice. if you don't get any actual feedback from someone in the know, my suggestion would be don't be too committed to making it all the way up your first time out there. might need a recon trip first.

    Lord Dashwood likes this.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    1,262
    Quote Originally Posted by 441211:
    I'm sure some of you must have done this...

    Anyway, I think I've convinced myself the best way is actually as described in my original link (or possibly in reverse). Considering each option:
    - The road option is eliminated by default.
    - The path starting from the road is probably the most crowded, so probably not the best way.
    - I'm not totally convinced I can easily find the trailhead on the eastern side and don't want to go on a wild goose chase.
    - Which leaves the two "purple" routes as in the linked site.

    Any thoughts?

    (PS: Actually, the main southern trailhead is actually much closer to the border than I originally thought; it's on Wutong road, just over a km from the border, so I would think quite easy to walk to. There seems to be a second less travelled southern terminus further east.)
    I haven't been on the hike but my wife is keen so I expect we'll do it later in the year...Autumn! We crossed at Sha Tau Kok a couple of months back and there were signs to the trail head on the big map at the bus station at the border (China side)...

    Hmmm....looking back at your post, I think that map is the map on the big board at the border!
    Elegiaque likes this.