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Recommendation on bad review at previous job and find new job

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  1. #21

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    Jun 2019
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    !


  2. #22

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    Jun 2019
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    Yes, it appears that it was wrong. But, this advice was given by two senior persons in the organization.
    Here I came to seek the help. please try not to judge. It is difficult to reply when people become insensitive. Thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile:
    Right, I think I can see why you might have had issues with work relationships.

  3. #23

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    Jun 2016
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    1,285
    Quote Originally Posted by HKDesi:
    yes
    Since that is the case I think its reasonable for them to rely on your internal performane reviews. If you felt they were not accurate you should have filed a greivance claim thru HR before your departure. As you did not, they are cast in stone. You won't be able to get another job there IMO. Why not try a rival firm? If you really want a job try other places.
    HKDesi likes this.

  4. #24

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    I didn't file grievance. But, provided the explanation about my performance with proper evidences (as suggested by senior colleagues) to next level and pointed out the errors in review and requesting them to reconsider. But, it didn't work. In order to avoid conflict, I resigned.
    About competitors, they were excited. I reached to 2nd or 3rd level of interview at 7-8 firms, but was dropped during offer time after they asking the name of the people they knew in the organization.

    After trying everything for more than year, I decided to write here and seek the advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by RMDNC:
    Since that is the case I think its reasonable for them to rely on your internal performane reviews. If you felt they were not accurate you should have filed a greivance claim thru HR before your departure. As you did not, they are cast in stone. You won't be able to get another job there IMO. Why not try a rival firm? If you really want a job try other places.

  5. #25

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    HK is a small place Its likely the people you interviewed with are friends of your former boss. You can sue but its not likely to get you a job. If you sue then that scares prospective employers but then again if successul you might have a lot of money.

    shri likes this.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by HKDesi:
    Hi, I was working with HSBC and resigned due to harassment by boss. She has given me bad review and feedback.
    .... <cut> ....
    Can anyone recommend me how to solve this problem and get hired?
    In order to solve problem, we would need to find the source first. There are many here who have worked at HSBC during various periods of their career. We can try our best to help, but without more details, then we cannot be more useful.

    1) Your more "senior colleagues" may have given you poor advice, as they themselves may not know what they are doing.
    2) Why are you "avoiding conflict" by resign? Most important: What was the conflict?
    It is normal to disagree with your boss or to have conflict with other co-worker, boss, cutsomer, ... etc.
    So need more background information / true reason of why did you resign by yourself
    E.g. ... was it a missed deadline, work delivered has wrong data, information was outdated, or such customer complaint , other team complaint to big boss ?

    3) Regarding finding job. Which part of the bank were you in ? Not needing detials, just departmental role, e.g.
    back office, technology, middle office, operations , settlement, front office, teller .... etc coz that will make it much easier to share any recruiting market information with you

  7. #27

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    Jun 2019
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    Thanks for your reply. Agree, more information is required here.

    1) Your more "senior colleagues" may have given you poor advice, as they themselves may not know what they are doing.
    - Possible.
    Actually, my friends who knew my work related harassments and complications also gave the same advice to 'fight back'.

    When you are constantly micro-managed, constant criticized over non-essential matters, bullied and harassed, you tend doubt about ‘self’.

    2) Why are you "avoiding conflict" by resign?
    - I put up brave face and continued to work and deliver in difficult time to meet the deadline.
    The HR hinted me to resign quietly and said that it would not affect on my performance or career. My manager had good rapport with top guys and I had no support. It was getting difficult to survive and seemed like a lost battle at the end.

    I waited for next level manager to decide, when he also sided with her, so resigned. He knew I was right and harassed, but he didn’t intervene.

    Most important: What was the conflict?
    It is normal to disagree with your boss or to have conflict with other co-worker, boss, cutsomer, ... etc.
    So need more background information / true reason of why did you resign by yourself
    E.g. ... was it a missed deadline, work delivered has wrong data, information was outdated, or such customer complaint , other team complaint to big boss ?


    When a team member resigned and she forgot to keep me in loop about important information and related deadline. She assumed it was okay to deliver late. There was a blind spot. When global team refused, she realized that she was about to miss the deadline. Although we worked around to fix it and delivered. But, she blamed me.

    Her team had major turnover and knowledge was not retained and passed on. It would frustrate the new joiner and the stakeholders both.

    Few stakeholders openly abused (verbally) and in front her too. When i pointed out she said I didn't fit into HSBC 'culture'.

    HSBC (and others) should perform annual check on temper and maturity level.

    3) Regarding finding job. Which part of the bank were you in ? Not needing detials, just departmental role, e.g.
    back office, technology, middle office, operations , settlement, front office, teller .... etc coz that will make it much easier to share any recruiting market information with you.

    Appreciate. Please PM me.

    Quote Originally Posted by LifeInHK:
    In order to solve problem, we would need to find the source first. There are many here who have worked at HSBC during various periods of their career. We can try our best to help, but without more details, then we cannot be more useful.

    1) Your more "senior colleagues" may have given you poor advice, as they themselves may not know what they are doing.
    2) Why are you "avoiding conflict" by resign? Most important: What was the conflict?
    It is normal to disagree with your boss or to have conflict with other co-worker, boss, cutsomer, ... etc.
    So need more background information / true reason of why did you resign by yourself
    E.g. ... was it a missed deadline, work delivered has wrong data, information was outdated, or such customer complaint , other team complaint to big boss ?

    3) Regarding finding job. Which part of the bank were you in ? Not needing detials, just departmental role, e.g.
    back office, technology, middle office, operations , settlement, front office, teller .... etc coz that will make it much easier to share any recruiting market information with you
    Last edited by HKDesi; 30-03-2020 at 05:29 PM.

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    242

    Any re-hiring will defacto prompt the new hiring manager to ask you about your old Boss. I have been in and out of an organizatoin 4 times and even though the hiring manager knew me well he had to go back and get some feedback from my boss in my previoius role. In the end, it is the hiring managers decision whether to uphold past feedback or give you another chance. As I reckon, there must have been a strong impression left when you resigned in the past and given that it is just bad luck in your current situation when you desperately need a job. There is no easy answer to this unfortunately. My suggestion will be to try somewhere else instead and look at a restart. In the end we have learnings from history for a better future. Always leave graciously is my rule and I have had some really bad colleagues who unfortunately I reported to.

    nivantj likes this.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    38

    I was.late last year, contacted by an ex-colleague to help him get around the situation where a previous boss was effectively 'blacking' him in HK in his attempts to get hired. He had been fired by the boss in question after a 'frank' exchange of views. Obviously, in that company, with that individual, he has completely burnt his boats. This is clear. He wont work there again. He could still consider a constructive dismissal case but decided to leave HK.
    Regarding your claims of harassment, you can take legal advice and go on from there. This can be a difficult and possibly expensive route for you but it is an option.
    The fact is, you will not work for HSBC again but if successful in your harassment claim, you may get a settlement. HSBC is large but it will check any data from its appointed officers, i.e your forrmer boss(es) in the same way a small company would ask a former boss for his/her opinion.
    In the case I mentioned, the person in question moved to Singapore where the ex-boss continued to not recommend him, in extreme terms, when a new hiring company requested references (as normal due dilligence) from previous employer.
    However, he did quite quickly manage to land a decent job where the hiring due diligence was done after he started in the position (not so unusual in finance, since contract is subject to due dilligence checks) and in a panic contaced me to talk to HR when they received the negative reference from the ex-boss. He was a month into his probationary period at this time.
    I knew both characters (especially the ex-boss) well enough to put some perspective on the firing situation when the HR department in question contacted me. They had a massively negative reference from the former boss and a new employee claiming his former boss was a complete asshole. So you can imagine they had mixed feeling about their new hire.
    He has ultimately retained his position subject to successfully completing his 6 month probation period (which may still be extended). All quite reasonable from the employer's perspective. That is his story.
    If you have strong reference from ex-colleagues, then you should fully organise and utilise these in future hiring situations.
    Good luck in your journey.

    shri and HKDesi like this.

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