Like Tree19Likes

Trail shoes: hoka one one vs 5.10s

Closed Thread
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,588

    Trail shoes: hoka one one vs 5.10s

    Just wondering what opinions all of you out there who go hiking might have about a good, supportive trail runner. As mentioned on the other threads, my partner needs to buy new shoes while he recovers from a knee injury. The Hoka One One has been suggested, and it does look good for what's needed (particularly if it's just a shoe he uses until he gets better or for long climbs down HK stairs). But after spraining my ankle about a month ago, I just can't see how these shoes are sensible given how high they are! It's like asking for a sprained ankle, and those are no fun at all.
    So then, 5.10s are another shoe that are often recommended. They seem to have a pretty thick sole which is supportive and they might be a better shoe for him in the long run, especially for scrambling. But! I got a pair of 5.10s myself about 6 months ago, and while the grip is fantastic on them on slippery surfaces, I did end up with this sprained ankle on the twins! I have felt they are overly sticky and thus caused me to fall (ankle got twisted in a rock). It was the worst fall I've ever had while hiking and I often do think if I had been wearing my regular Meindl hiking boots, it wouldn't have happened. When I first started wearing them I often felt my feet stumbling a bit.
    So, I'm just curious if any of you have either Hoka Ones or 5.10s and can offer any feedback from your experience using them on HK trails and their support for your knees. Or are there any other suggestions?

    Edit: sorry, forgot to mention, I said for trail runners, and what I mean is a good shoe for long day hikes in HK (going up and down hills eventually). Not for actual running on trails.

    Last edited by Elegiaque; 04-02-2014 at 11:47 AM.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    3,269

    I use viabram 5 fingers as it is by far the most comfortable shoe I have found for long distance hikes. It is just short of being barefoot. The only thing I would say against them is that you will feel the heat on tarmac on very hot days.


  3. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    13,099

    Anyone tried these : http://xeroshoes.com/ ?
    I've been looking at them for a long while but never got around to ordering/trying them.....


  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    11,885

    Elegiaque: I'm a bit confused by your terminology, as "supportive" in a shoe usually refers to arch support or ankle support, and not to knees.

    If you mean arch support: All shoes seem to have cheap and terrible footbeds and you're better off replacing the 10 cent foam 'footbed' with something like a Superfeet (cheap) or custom molded (expensive) footbed.

    If you mean ankle support: Something like this is hugely superior to high top hiking preventing sprained ankles.

    If you mean some sort of hugely padded thing that reduces impact borne by the knees, I have no idea or experience. I would have thought that a set of hiking poles would be much relevant though. Properly used, they take a lot of stress off the knees, especially when going up/down hills.

    HK_Katherine likes this.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    11,885
    Quote Originally Posted by HowardCoombs:
    Anyone tried these : http://xeroshoes.com/ ?
    I've been looking at them for a long while but never got around to ordering/trying them.....
    Huh, they look really weird. Barefoot running gladiator sandals.

    They seem a little dubious though- one of the reasons for wearing shoes vs, say, Tevas, when hiking is that shoes keep all those annoying little pebbles out from under your foot. Tevas seem to involve frequent stops to knock pebbles out.
    East_coast likes this.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,588

    I mean something padded to help reduce the impact to the knees -- nothing to do with ankles/feet. We were fortunate enough to get a pair of hiking poles while Charmonix had their 30% off sale, so we've got those now, which are good.
    What kind of shoes do you use for hiking around HK?

    I also think the xeroshoes would be generally useless, unless you knew you were only going on a concrete surface. Your feet would get pretty dirty here... plus think of insect bites! (Or potentially snake bites, even...) I think generally whenever out and about you'd need protection for your feet -- hah, now that I think about it, considering how crowded HK streets are, you'd have to watch your toes just on the street!


  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    HK
    Posts
    14,625

    I'd recommend you read a bit more on these two websites (manned by avid trail runners/hikers who know their stuff).

    I would completely avoid Vibram 5 fingers if you need cushioning....

    http://ultra168.com/

    and

    http://www.irunfar.com/

    the gear review section.

    Elegiaque likes this.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    11,885
    Quote Originally Posted by Elegiaque:
    I mean something padded to help reduce the impact to the knees -- nothing to do with ankles/feet. We were fortunate enough to get a pair of hiking poles while Charmonix had their 30% off sale, so we've got those now, which are good.
    What kind of shoes do you use for hiking around HK?
    Assuming that was directed at me, then whatever were the lightest and best ventilated 5.10s that I could find at Chamonix. I prefer as much grip as possible when walking.

    Padding to reduce impact to knees... completely outside my experience, sorry. I would assume that the vast majority of shoes would be identical in this regard and that the biggest difference would come down to hiking poles and biomechanics. When I was much younger I used to wear heavy boots and slam down on descents, which promptly screwed one of my knees. I had to do a bunch of physio work and adopt a much more fluid descent style to recover.
    Elegiaque likes this.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    12,333

    I use a mix of different shoes depending on the conditions and the trail in question. For anything damp or slippery - always 5.10's. BUT - they are heavy and not that comfortable. GREAT grip, but low cut so not much in the way of ankle support.

    For basic hiking for good grip, waterproof in the wet, and average ankle support, I used Icebugs (Protrek sells them). Their rubber is not quite as grippy as 5.10's but not bad; they are much more comfortable and a heck of a lot lights.

    As for Hoka's, they are on the list to try. I have not got around to it yet. I know several people who swear by them for comfort, but also who say that the soles run out very fast and they are expensive to have to keep replacing (I guess because the rubber is so soft)? But, I get sore feet easily, so do want to try them!

    That's my 2 cents. I would never wear anything with high ankles in HK - it's far to hot, they are heavy and frankly, I think it's better to build up ankle and knee muscles as they are going to protect you far better than a pair of boots!

    Elegiaque likes this.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    4,821

    I think you know my views on this. I hike 50-100km per week (just come off a 31km hike as I type this), I'm 30kg overweight according to the BMI charts, and I have cartilages torn in both knees from skiing years ago. I can only do this because I discovered Hoka One One shoes. They provide tremendous cushioning for the knees (and ankles) without sacrificing much in stability, and they have surprisingly good "ground feel".

    The one slight downside is that they are not the best shoe in very wet and slippery conditions. For that I keep a different shoe, which is currently a Treksta, but by all accounts it is exactly that area in which 5.10s excel - everyone who has them says they are superb on wet and/or loose terrain. The downside with them is that they wear quite quickly.

    But the Hokas are fine for all but the extremes - I quite happily wear them over High Junk Peak, or down Lo Fu Tau, for example. I've probably done over 5000km in Hokas in the last 3 years.

    So in summary, my recommendation (assuming that the fit of the shoes is OK) would be to get a pair of each: Hokas for general hiking, and (on the basis of what many people have told me) 5.10s for extreme wet/slippy stuff.

    Specifically on the Hokas, there are currently two mens trail models available in HK (at Lantau Base Camp, Escapade (CWB branch) and, I think, Racing the Planet); there are also some road models with a less rugged tread. The Mafate 3 has slightly more cushioning, a slightly wider toe box, and laces wider. The Stinson Evo B Trail is still very well cushioned and with the slightly narrower lacing I find it gives a slightly more supportive feel around the foot. I actually own one pair of each at the moment and tend to switch between them, using the Mafate for hikes with more paved surfaces and less rough stuff, and the Stinson for hikes more on dirt or over longer distances.

    Edit - to HK_Katherine's point on wear, I would say that the current models seem better than last year's in this respect, and I'm expecting to get maybe 7-800km at least out of each pair.

    Hope that helps.

    Last edited by Gruntfuttock; 04-02-2014 at 03:46 PM.

Closed Thread
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast