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  • 3 Post By hullexile
  • 1 Post By Cwbguy

Adulterated milk by KLIM--the label admits it. Joke's on me?

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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    191

    Adulterated milk by KLIM--the label admits it. Joke's on me?

    I've been buying Klim powdered milk for years. I couple days ago I got home from the shop I always go to, opened it up, and saw it was the wrong color. Put it in my tea, and yep, the taste was wrong. Based on the label, it contains 30%+ adulterants, but they were clever so it's impossible to tell how much--that is, they added extra carbohydrates, protein, sugars, and fats, so it's impossible to tell how much of each component was added by comparing it to normal milk.

    All the ingredients are nontoxic, but I'm obviously not going to drink milk that's at least 30% maltodextrin. Is there anything I can do about this? I can complain to the pharmacy, call Nestle's Hong Kong number (they own the brand), and write to the manufacturer in Taiwan, but I don't know if any of that will help. Can I pursue a refund, or am I out of luck? The can says "KLIM Instant Milk Powder", (rather than "KLIM Blend of Cheese-Making Byproducts Partially Containing Milk"), so the contents is not as described, despite the fine print.


  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Why not just buy milk?


  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    191
    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile
    Why not just buy milk?
    You can't use milk to make Chinese-style milk tea. It would be watery, and not taste like milk. I don't do the "tea and a splash of milk" thing. Either it's tea, or it's Asia-style milk tea. Nothing in between.

  4. #4

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    Jul 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by matchstick man
    You can't use milk to make Chinese-style milk tea. It would be watery, and not taste like milk. I don't do the "tea and a splash of milk" thing. Either it's tea, or it's Asia-style milk tea. Nothing in between.
    You are correct here, you don't use milk, or milk powder.

    To make authentic milk tea you use evaporated milk. Can't imagine anything more vile in tea than milk powder!

    Hong Kong-style milk tea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Authentic and Delicious Hong Kong Style Milk Tea Recipe | Cooking with Alison
    shri likes this.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    191
    Quote Originally Posted by Cwbguy
    To make authentic milk tea you use evaporated milk.
    Indeed.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cwbguy
    Can't imagine anything more vile in tea than milk powder!
    Come on, you just made that up. My brief internet searching indicates that almost nobody believes there's a significant difference. Dry milk is evaporated milk that has been a little more evaporated. So why do the recipes typically call for evaporated milk? Simple: in the USA, stores don't carry full fat dry milk. It's almost nonexistent. So for milk flavor that actually tastes like milk (i.e., with fat), the only real choice is evaporated milk. Also, dry milk is difficult to mix without clumping.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=diff...vaporated+milk
    Last edited by matchstick man; 15-03-2015 at 03:19 PM.