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Compact bbq grill

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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cheung Sha Wan
    Posts
    13

    Used to use charcoal grill for many years but don’t feel like cleaning the mess afterwards anymore. Switched to gas grill a couple of years ago, happy with the result. But your Lotus grill seems handy and easy to use and store though.


  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cheung Sha Wan
    Posts
    13

    I got mine from ECOX, they threw in a set of bbq utensils and a cover wrap as bonus, free delivery too. Not a bad deal at all - FYI

    shri likes this.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    猴山
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    18,343

    Enjoy
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    Rob2020 likes this.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    109

    Didn't know there were so many pitmasters here! Anyone know any tricks to get that charcoal taste on a gas grill? I used to use liquid smoke but I haven't been able to buy them here in HK.


  5. #15

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,365
    Quote Originally Posted by East_coast:
    Enjoy
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    you need to slap a NSFW warning on this post !!!

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    9

    Finally moved into a place with an outdoor space! Any BBQ recommendations with a circa HK$5k budget? Prefer gas for cleaning purposes.


  7. #17

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    ShamShuiPo or Chicago
    Posts
    162

    The common way of cleaning any grill is taking an appropriate wire brush to it only when it is at grilling temperature. This may also be combined with a burn-off method... not much different than the ‘self-clean cycle’ found in home ovens.

    The process I follow before, during, and after a grilling session is to minimize clean-up for the next session. Spraying a caustic cleaning chemical onto a grate that the family eats from is not wise regardless of how “safe” the manufacturer/vendor claims.

    Very first thing I do is start the burners before anything else. The goal is to have it reach 200°C while I’m collecting food items. Returning to the hot grill, I’ll sweep along the flow of the grates with a stainless delta-shaped wire BBQ brush. Turn the flame to low or off and spray the grates with oil. Some use canola, grapeseed, or avocado oils. Others will moisten a paper towel with olive oil and mop it over the grates. This is the key to minimizing food sticking. I do this only once at the beginning.

    When the last item is finished grilling, the burners get cranked to max while the food is brought to the table. The goal at this stage is to have the lid-down grill reach 260-290°C and hold it there for 5 minutes. The temp and duration chars any stuck foods or BBQ sugars to ash. That gets scrubbed clean with the wire brush. Once it’s cooled down, the tank valve is shut, the rain cover goes on and it’s ready for the next session. It’s critical to not dance much above 290° as food and drippings inside the grill bowl might catch fire. Neighbors observing this pyrotechnic show might be screaming into the fire dept’s line before you’re able to snuff it out.

    Some of the southern US pit masters have been known to carry a spray bottle of water at their side expressly to handle flare-ups.

    shri likes this.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cheung Sha Wan
    Posts
    13

    For under $5k you should consider the Weber Q series gas grills, if you want to buy a new one. The setting up is easy and plenty of shops that supply gas canisters.


  9. #19

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    ShamShuiPo or Chicago
    Posts
    162
    Quote Originally Posted by Miaofromcali:
    ...any tricks to get that charcoal taste on a gas grill?
    One of the things on my "Try" list is to get a stainless steel enclosure designed to fit between the flavorizer tents in the big grill. Other companies make similar universal boxes for other grills. The perimeter side walls are usually perforated. Grilling aficionados will soak chunks of hickory, mesquite, or apple wood in water, then place it in the box. The box being underneath the grate and between burners will heat to the point where the moistened wood smokes to provide additional flavor. Outside of a grilling specialty shop, I'm not certain anyone in HK would carry these wood species. I'd recommend AGAINST picking up wood meant for furniture construction as it may likely be treated with formaldehyde -- then again for cigarette junkies out there, I suppose that would be an ENTICEMENT and not a deterrent.

    Bringing this back around to the original question, I would posit this trick should somewhat work for charcoal instead of hickory wood... an Altoids tin or equivalent, vent holes pierced throughout, fill with smaller crumbles of charcoal, light the coals and find a spot underneath the burners (since lit coals don't need additional heat). There should be enough smoke coming from a tin-sized portion of coal to affect a lid-closed small balcony grill. Perhaps additionally mix pieces of soaked hickory in there?

    After grilling, when everything has cooled down and the coals have burned completely into ash, the tin can get lifted out and either emptied or doused with water and disposed.

    All standard disclaimers apply, YMMV as this is just a thought experiment.
    shri likes this.

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