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One year after leaving Hong Kong

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  1. #21

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    Yes HK definitely has lost a lot of its shine for me. Of course there are things I will miss when I leave which is hopefully soon but I am happy to remedy that with an occasional stopover on the way to more interesting places from time to time.

    I have a good friend that retired to the island a couple of years back. He is not missing HK at all and figures he pulled the trigger at the perfect time. I can't disagree with him.

    For the NZ thing. When in doubt always best to say NZ, it's less insulting than the other way around. Same for CAN-US, always best to go for Canadian first

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  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by civil_servant:
    Making money so that once you go back you too can afford all the toys that Titus has opposed to the average BC resident who's carrying lots of consumer debt to keep up with Titus.
    LOL I don't even know where to begin.... getting air dropped back into Canadian affairs but from a rural perspective has been interesting.... the town went through a lumber mill closure but now is going through an oil pipeline boom (population 2300 but we're going to have 2000 pipeline workers in town this fall for at least 2 years for the Trans Mountain pipeline) and I can see how there are divides between so many different layers of society; east coast old political elite vs western resources, city vs rural, etc. Throw in this covid devastation on the economy and I'm quite glad I'm not going to be in the cities if anything happens

    And LOL I started doing bartering with my mini excavator that I bought with my savings that I would not have had if I didn't do what I had to do in HK for 15 years... digging stuff to trade for frozen game meat topped with cash LOL

  3. #23

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    Long post. What are your thoughts about your kids inevitable move to Hong Kong after they graduate? And this is even if they need to go to college in the future.

    I couldn't live in Canada.

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  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aramis:
    Yes HK definitely has lost a lot of its shine for me. Of course there are things I will miss when I leave which is hopefully soon but I am happy to remedy that with an occasional stopover on the way to more interesting places from time to time.

    I have a good friend that retired to the island a couple of years back. He is not missing HK at all and figures he pulled the trigger at the perfect time. I can't disagree with him.

    For the NZ thing. When in doubt always best to say NZ, it's less insulting than the other way around. Same for CAN-US, always best to go for Canadian first
    Hopefully for the sake of HK, if we draw the timeline out long enough these things recently will be a small bump in the road like SARS =(
    Yea I don't miss the things, just the relationships especially with covid right now it's near impossible for any friends to visit me from HK

  5. #25

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    Small town BC make for very interesting and often divided politics. There are usually some outdoorsy, hippie environmentalist types, there are often some natives, there are the blue worker/logger/miner types, there are the town professionals and often a few city folks from the big city that have settled there. Makes for people with very different values/needs and it's not always easy to be on the town councils. Have to be pretty thick skinned.

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  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by DimSumBond:
    Long post. What are your thoughts about your kids inevitable move to Hong Kong after they graduate? And this is even if they need to go to college in the future.

    I couldn't live in Canada.
    I've wondered about that but I'm not a typical HK parent =P no point in thinking about stuff that you can't control way out in the future. Another thing that drew me to Clearwater was how there's a recent Harvard graduate who was born and bred Clearwater and my realtor went to UBC like myself. If you put in the effort, there's actually not much of a handicap to growing up in a small town especially now a days knowledge is everywhere. And then there's Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops an hour drive away that lots of local kids go to and grow up leading happy lives.

    If they choose to go back to HK, hopefully my business is still running by then to provide them with something of a base and my parents still have real estate in HK (but that's between grandparents and grandchildren, I never lived with the expectation that anything my parents will be automatically passed onto me)

    LOL you remind me of my aunt and my in laws, they're in HK and yep they also could never live in Canada
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  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Titus:
    I've wondered about that but I'm not a typical HK parent =P no point in thinking about stuff that you can't control way out in the future. Another thing that drew me to Clearwater was how there's a recent Harvard graduate who was born and bred Clearwater and my realtor went to UBC like myself. If you put in the effort, there's actually not much of a handicap to growing up in a small town especially now a days knowledge is everywhere. And then there's Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops an hour drive away that lots of local kids go to and grow up leading happy lives.

    If they choose to go back to HK, hopefully my business is still running by then to provide them with something of a base and my parents still have real estate in HK (but that's between grandparents and grandchildren, I never lived with the expectation that anything my parents will be automatically passed onto me)

    LOL you remind me of my aunt and my in laws, they're in HK and yep they also could never live in Canada
    All I know is that Canada has a very poor retention rate when it comes to keeping young people in the country. I believe it's the small jobs market, isolation and weather... I am not sure... could even be missing family still living in your home country.

    It looks like a nice place for those who enjoy the outdoors and have a lot of leisurely time on their hands.

    Would be interesting to see how the kids adjust. Good luck. Keep us posted.
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  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aramis:
    Small town BC make for very interesting and often divided politics. There are usually some outdoorsy, hippie environmentalist types, there are often some natives, there are the blue worker/logger/miner types, there are the town professionals and often a few city folks from the big city that have settled there. Makes for people with very different values/needs and it's not always easy to be on the town councils. Have to be pretty thick skinned.
    All very true, but I feel the hippies and resource industry types get along pretty well here; or better than in urban centers.

    One of the observations or superficial theory I came up with small towns vs big cities and actually repeated by a local to me once:
    Big cities gives people the anonymity to do things that can be anti social or cruel. In small towns, your reputation sticks with you so you are more concerned with maintaining a good one. Someone told me the bad side is as youths we all make mistakes and in small towns, those mistakes could brand you for life. And yea, some find it necessary to move away after no one else in town would do business with them because of their developed reputation. I find that good because good reputations will be rewarded.

    LOL forgot one more thing that has been awesome.... I have not given ONE single driver or pedestrian the middle finger for the last year!!!!! ROFL

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by DimSumBond:
    All I know is that Canada has a very poor retention rate when it comes to keeping young people in the country. I believe it's the small jobs market, isolation and weather... I am not sure... could even be missing family still living in your home country.

    It looks like a nice place for those who enjoy the outdoors and have a lot of leisurely time on their hands.

    Would be interesting to see how the kids adjust. Good luck. Keep us posted.
    Fair enough, actually a highschooler son of a friend told my wife sometime last year that he and other kids don't expect to stay in Clearwater after they graduate highschool; in fact all of them expect to go travel either to big cities like Vancouver or do some overseas travel. The realtor who went to UBC used to play in the NHL, he said the usual course of a Clearwater person is to leave town when they are 18, do whatever in the world but once they get married, they usually come back to have their family and raise kids because it's a good environment. And I see that too, everyone from the lady at the recycling depot to my contractor has lived and been all over the country/overseas and came back in their 30s or 40s.

    But again for my kids, that's their own decision to make and hopefully I still have stuff going on that gives them the luxury of choice
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  10. #30

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    IMHO kids growing up in a small town like this will have access to life experiences that are difficult to get in HK. Most Canadian kids especially in small town learn to drive, use power tools, do home renovations, mechanical stuff + all the outdoorsy stuff like canoeing/kayaking/skiing, snowmobiles, bikes, motorbikes, hunting, fishing. No DH so they have to learn to look after themselves a bit more, do chores around the house.

    My buddies kids can't stop smiling when they're at the cottage going hunting or fishing or even cutting trees on the 4 wheeler or snowmobile. Some want the big city life but not all...

    So true about kids going away in their late teens and twenties and often coming back later in life. To fully appreciate a place, it's often good to leave and explore other places. It's also very true for myself.

    Last edited by Aramis; 22-07-2020 at 03:24 PM.

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