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Watching my HK colleagues become expats in Taiwan

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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by huja:
    I assume you mean dialect of Chinese? The two most commonly spoken dialects in Taiwan are Mandarin and Minnan hua (Taiwanese). You'll get by just fine with Mandarin in Taipei. You'd have to be pretty far out in the sticks to reach a dead end with only Mandarin skills.
    Mandarin is a language.
    Hokkien is a language.
    Cantonese is a language.
    Shanghainese is a language.
    Flapster likes this.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sage:
    Nothing surprises me about the depths HK'ers can sink to in this regard anymore. :-(
    I think the commonly appreciated social contracts that most Westerners adhere to (ie., holding the door open for strangers, not stopping in the middle of the sidewalk without first checking your surroundings) just don't hold true in HK and most of Asia (probably with the exception of Japan and Korea but I'm biased here).

    I like to think that Larry David could fill multiple seasons of Curb Your Enthusiasm critiquing the lack of social contracts / awareness in Hong Kong. Probably a whole season on lift etiquette alone.
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  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paxbritannia:
    Mandarin is a language.
    Hokkien is a language.
    Cantonese is a language.
    Shanghainese is a language.
    Not really.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by tf19:
    ....and most of Asia (probably with the exception of Japan and Korea but I'm biased here).
    I disagree with 'most of Asia', Japan is a shining example and Korea is close behind, but the rest of Asia is also ok too. We know where the problems really lie....

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by tf19:
    I think the commonly appreciated social contracts that most Westerners adhere to (ie., holding the door open for strangers, not stopping in the middle of the sidewalk without first checking your surroundings) just don't hold true in HK and most of Asia (probably with the exception of Japan and Korea but I'm biased here).

    I like to think that Larry David could fill multiple seasons of Curb Your Enthusiasm critiquing the lack of social contracts / awareness in Hong Kong. Probably a whole season on lift etiquette alone.
    Wow, talk about MASSIVE over generalisation of over half the world's population.
    Coolboy and AsianXpat0 like this.

  6. #36

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    It didn't take too long for some to turn this thread into complaints about HK and HKers

    Coolboy, GentleGeorge and jdf21st like this.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sage:
    There's a difference between complaining that can lead to better outcomes and complaining just for complaining.

    I've never complained about the lack of certain foods/brands/tastes in HK, But would complain about pollution or unnecessary bureaucracy or the selfishness of locals on the street.

    I think people who come from more diverse cultures are significantly less likely to indulge in the lower form of complaining - with the express exception of the Japanese who grin and bear it like heroes.
    Yes but that is not unique to HKers. Expats have problems with both types of complaining too.

  8. #38
    jgl
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    Quote Originally Posted by MABinPengChau:
    Priceless...

    People facing discrimination- we were trying to rent a flat together (since we won't all be there at the same time) and the landlord wanted an illegal three months' deposit. Because we are foreigners...

    Complaints about food...

    Complaints about locals...

    The kind of stuff I have dealt with as a serial expat, they are experiencing for the first time- for at least one woman in her mid-30's it's the first time she has lived away from home at all.

    Culture shock! I had one person tell me how she thought it would just be the same but...it wasn't. (Even in the US moving from one region to another is a culture shock so we know moving from one country to another is a HUGE culture shock).

    Even though people are generally happy to be in Taiwan, it is fascinating to watch them become first-time expats...
    Once I figured out that this was about HK locals moving to Taiwan, this moved from mildly confusing to really funny

    Taiwan and HK are so totally different in many ways, there are things that I really love about Taiwan (people are much more open and friendly, access to nature is good) but in other ways it reminds me of 1980s China with all the concrete slab construction. Really great people though, best place in the world for hitch-hiking, at least in my experience.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by civil_servant:
    Taipei is hotter in the summertime, but not more humid than Hong Kong. But claiming that Peng Chau beats ANYWHERE on the planets is extremely far-fetched. Taiwan's East Coast gets a massive amount of rain with high humidity around Keelung and Yilan, while experiencing the same temperatures as Taipei. The Taiwanese mountains also experience some of the largest annual rainfalls on the entire planet. Thus you don't need to go far to experience hotter and more humid than Peng Chau.
    hotter than Peng Chau, lots of places...more humid...yes, that part is hyperbole. Peng Chau mostly cooler than the rest of HK...have not found Taipei to be more humid...also, most of us are in Linkou, a cooler suburb. But 3 of us are moving out of Linkou soon...

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coolboy:
    Yes but that is not unique to HKers. Expats have problems with both types of complaining too.
    Yes for sure, expats (a loaded word these days) can be 'guilty' of both, but my point is that people from less diverse societies are more likely to complain about those things.

    HK's size (The goldfish bowl we often refer to it as) also contributes to that in a way that being from Europe most certainly would not.

    But at the same, time there's a huge difference between. 'Taiwan is not as good as HK because it doesn't serve milk tea' and 'ah I'll miss milk tea living in Taiwan'.

    It bug's the hell out of me when people label balanced observations as 'complaining' (not that I'm saying that you're doing that specifically)
    Last edited by Sage; 15-09-2020 at 03:32 PM.

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