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Cycling in Hong Kong

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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,012

    Agreed, Cannondales are expensive but IMO you 'do' get what you pay for.

    My 12 year old, well used Killer V is evidence of this - all original equipment apart from an upgrade to V-brakes and new front fork/wheel (Due to collision with motorbike )

    That Rize looks good, I'm not really up to speed with the latest technology (The above is evidence ) but is the rear shock an active type, i.e. will only work when a bump is encountered and therefore doesn't require a manual lockout?


  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Kowloon
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by Stoob:
    Agreed, Cannondales are

    That Rize looks good, I'm not really up to speed with the latest technology (The above is evidence ) but is the rear shock an active type, i.e. will only work when a bump is encountered and therefore doesn't require a manual lockout?
    Not sure, good question. All I know is it is easily adjustable.
    I'll have to check that out.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    11,103
    Quote Originally Posted by jtflies:
    Great! I went to flying ball the other day and was astonished at the prices of Cannondales. I guess you get what you pay for, but they seemed unreasonably high. I ended up buying a trek from my local shop in Tung Chung. I ordered a 21.5" Trek 6000 from him and got it a week later fresh out of the box. Payed around 5500 for it and its turned out to be a pretty nice hardtail. I've also been hitting up the trails around Tung Chung and Tai O and they are very nice as long as you don't ride on the weekends - too many people walking the trails made for a tricky ride.

    Edit: Oh and I went to Mui Wo and check out the Friendly bike shop. Nice people but buyer beware! Some of the bikes they were selling had the good equipement stripped for cheap crap saying that they modified the bike to make it better. So if you buy there, make sure you are getting the derailer, crank, etc you are paying for.
    Sounds like this could have been a misunderstanding or sloppy communication by the person you spoke to. They (and most the other stores) do make a habit of offering bikes with the standard components replaced with lower end ones, but they also end up reducing the price. That's why they can offer full suspension Giants for less than what a frame alone would cost you in the US.

    But I agree- it's best to go into bike stores with some understanding of what good and bad components are. People who run the stores here do tend to be a bit brief with their explanations, probably due to an English thing.
    Last edited by jgl; 13-05-2008 at 10:49 AM.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Kowloon
    Posts
    119

    jgl,

    What set up are you riding?


  5. #15

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Tung Chung
    Posts
    83
    Quote Originally Posted by jgl:
    Sounds like this could have been a misunderstanding or sloppy communication by the person you spoke to. They (and most the other stores) do make a habit of offering bikes with the standard components replaced with lower end ones, but they also end up reducing the price. That's why they can offer full suspension Giants for less than what a frame alone would cost you in the US.

    But I agree- it's best to go into bike stores with some understanding of what good and bad components are. People who run the stores here do tend to be a bit brief with their explanations, probably due to an English thing.
    Totally agree. I was please when my bike came in a box from the factory and they assembled it in front of me. Bike came with all the goodies it was supposed to have and I was very pleased with what I got for the price. Sram X5 front and rear derailer, Deore crank, Rockshox fork, and Bontrager seat, wheels, and tires. All middle of the road stuff but I got what I paid for. But for those looking for a bike, do some research ahead of time so you know what you are buying into. Also, I got a friend looking for a used bike (full suspension) if anyone knows of anything. He's not keen on buying a brand new one since he's got 2 back in the states.

  6. #16

    Trek Mountain Bike for Sale

    Just read thru this forum, I have a Trek mountain bike, brought over from the USA several years ago and its been sitting in storage. The frame and gears are all in good condition, however, it needs a FULL complete tune-up, wheels, gears, brakes, etc....

    BUt this is a genuine TREK, paid over $1,500 USD when I bought it about 10 years ago...haven't rode it in about 8 years....

    Willing to sell to all you adventurous mountaineers...just send me a PM and I can send you some pics... also give me a reasonable offer and its yours.....


  7. #17

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    11,103

    Ugh... a 10 year old hardtail isn't going to be much fun on most HK trails.


  8. #18

    You sound like an expert...what is a hardtail? what is a non-hardtail? I bought my TREK and only used it for less than 1 year....was not an expert mountaineers...only a newbie at that time...I been tempted to get my bike fully tuned-up and bring it out on the trails...but not too familiar about where to go...any insights would be appreciated....


  9. #19

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    11,103

    'Hardtail' refers to a bike with front suspension, as opposed to 'full suspension' bike which has front and rear.

    There's a good trail that starts at Mui Wo. Catch the ferry from Central and ask at Friendly Bike Store (easy to find) for directions.

    In theory, you should apply for a free permit to ride in HK parks, but in practise I have never been checked.

    The application form is here: AFCD Applying a permit


  10. #20

    Thanks...I will look into this trail...I hope its an easy one.... but my TREK is still for sale if anyone is interested....


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