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Cycling in Hong Kong

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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl:
    Ugh... a 10 year old hardtail isn't going to be much fun on most HK trails.
    I dunno... I've had a blast on a basic hardtail in HK... the occasional mishap, sometimes the chain falling off etc.. old age and a sense of self preservation have warded me off doing anything too silly anyway. I'm not sure dual suspension would make it much different for an old bugger like me
    Last edited by dropdedfwed; 14-05-2008 at 06:04 PM.

  2. #22

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    If I buy my bike from Flying Ball, how the hell do I get it back to my place in Wan Chai if I can't use the MTR??

    And don't say ride it

    Last edited by Cookie666; 15-05-2008 at 12:09 PM.

  3. #23

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    In the back of a taxi. Or assuming you don't want to scratch up your shiny new bike in a taxi, get a van. They should be able to call up a van for you. Or you ride down Nathan Rd to TST, then jump on the ferry to Wan Chai.

    I just had a look at the Rize and it looks like Cannondale has simply copied the Yeti '08 575 (single pivot, linkage driven, high shock), so you might want to check that out as well.

    Last edited by jgl; 15-05-2008 at 12:09 PM.

  4. #24

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    I'll check it out.
    What about the rest of the Yeti's, brakes, cranks etc?


  5. #25

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    High end bikes in HK are generally custom. You can choose whatever parts you want.


  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cookie666:
    If I buy my bike from Flying Ball, how the hell do I get it back to my place in Wan Chai if I can't use the MTR??

    And don't say ride it
    in a bag. they sell bike bags at Flying Ball for between $450-650 from memory. they're made from cordura and you take the front wheel off, slide the bike in the bag, put the front wheel in beside the frame. a piece of cardboard b/w wheel and down tube and you're on your way. they're a bit bulky, but they work just fine.

    only possible prob is if it is a downhill bike, apparently the extra-long fork won't fit, but the average MTB and Roady will be ok... I haven't used the bags from Flying Ball, I got mine from Groundeffect, and it fits my roady ok (and it is an "old fashioned" steel frame, full sized, not a compact little frame like you buy these days!)...

    DDF

    I forgot to add... once the bike is in the bag you can take it on the MTR.. Doh!
    Last edited by dropdedfwed; 15-05-2008 at 03:19 PM.

  7. #27

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    Yeah seen those, think I'll grab a van


  8. #28

    Bikes on MTR

    Quote Originally Posted by dot.zen:
    I was about to purchase a mountain bike today but my work colleagues tell me that you are not allowed to take a bike on the MTR.
    I live on Lantau Island, so it seems that I would be restricted to riding there. Not what I had in mind.

    Is this restriction real?

    dot.zen

    We just asked at the MTR customer service and were told bikes are ok, you just pay an additional luggage charge. Also, just observed 2-3 guys with bikes exiting the Shatin MTR no problems. Maybe the policy is changing.

  9. #29

    Anyone know any good trail rides starting from Tung Chung? Also, can I put my bike on a bus to Disco Bay from Tung Chung? Thanks.


  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by subicpilot:
    Anyone know any good trail rides starting from Tung Chung? Also, can I put my bike on a bus to Disco Bay from Tung Chung? Thanks.
    From what I understand that's a negative on the busses from DB. Not sure what you can do to get out of there other than take the trail to Mui Wo and grab a blue cab to Tung Chung. I just biked the trail from Tung Chung to Tai O today(almost made it to Tai O but almost committed suicide by instead climbing the hill up to the Buddha today). The trail is fantastic (not too many long climbs) but a little tricky to find if you don't know where the trail head is. But it essentially gets off the road at the far end of the Yat Tung estate and follows the shoreline across from the airport and goes around the north side of Lantau. I'll see if I can plot it on google maps.

    I'd be more than happy to show you, been riding with some guys from work, but I'll need a few days recovery after today's suicide mission. Note, make sure to bring plenty of water if you make a good trip, as many of the villages don't have any place to buy drinks.

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