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any sports recommended for weight loss.

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  1. #31

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    First of all, there is no BEST sport or program for weight loss. All this arguing between fitness experts is ridiculous. The fact is that everything works, and some things work better for other people. You ask the top 5 fittest people at your gym what they do and you'll get 5 different answers. But some things they generally have in common: cook yourself, eat vegetables, take omega-3 fats, remember to do your laundry and most importantly: EAT, DON'T STARVE YOURSELF.

    But anyways, here is my general answer for people trying lose weight:

    High intensity work takes way less time and is more effective in weight loss and making you fitter. Hill sprints are great in HK. Take a walk down a hill as a warm-up. Use your phone to keep time and sprint uphill for 15 seconds. And I mean SPRINT, 100%, everything you got! Rest 1:45 and repeat 8 times. This process takes 30 minutes. The high intensity stuff really triggers signals in your body for weight loss. If you go hiking, sprint up a hill now and then.

    Nutrition wise you want to decrease your calories and simple carbs. Keep carbs around 150g per day and about 30-50 more on training days. Eat lots of vegetables, they are magical. Avoid carbs in the morning so that you can keep your growth hormone up since sleep. In the end it's a lot about hormones and signaling in your body. You can be on low calorie all you want but if I inject you with insulin you will gain weight. If I inject you with testosterone you'll gain muscle. Plenty of research shows GH is valuable for weightloss, it is highest when you're asleep, and insulin spikes in the morning instantly drop GH. For calories, if you calculated that your body needs 2000 calories and the website suggest 1750 calories per day for yourself, you may think, "Well if I only take in 1500 I'll lose weight faster!" FALSE. Don't do it. Trust me.

    Oh, and once or twice a week, lift heavy shit.


  2. #32

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    My three cents worth. you need to make a lifestyle change, debating which exercise is better is bs. you want to make a change which is permanent and part of an ongoing lifestyle. These are my tips as someone who smoked 40 a day, drank quite a bit and played the odd football game to nowadays smokes zero, ok still likes beer, but also did a few triathlons last season and cycle 80km a week minimum, plus run and swim a bit every week.

    1. Join a club for a sport you enjoy, and has members you like being around. This can be a hash, footy club, Tri club, hiking group anything. They won't bite you and are a lot cheaper than some PT gym deal. more importantly, you'll enjoy it more.

    2. Mix up the exercise a bit. Focusing on one sport can lead to injuries if you are not careful.

    3. Build up slowly, if there is one thing more expensive than gym and PT fees in HK, try physios.


  3. #33

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    I really wish that I could find this one article I read that argued convincingly that exercise doesn't help in weight loss.

    Apparently there has only ever been one *longitudinal* study which measured weight loss for a large set of people as they increased their exercise. It was from the 60s and has never been replicated. All other studies show that the proportion of exercisers who lose weight over a sustained period of time is no better than for a control group of non exercisers. The only ones who lose weight are those who strictly control their diets, with average weight loss about the same regardless of whether or not they increase their exercise.

    Key reasons are that exercise makes you hungrier and also more likely to compensate with treats (eg I've run five miles so I am allowed to eat that bacon sandwich).

    Most people tend to think exercise works because those who exercise most tend to be thinner. However that only shows a correlation and doesn't establish causation. It seems quite likely that those who do most exercise do so because they are genetically predisposed to be thin and active.

    If you want to lose weight then focus on your diet. And by all means do more exercise because there's plenty of other benefits apart from weight loss.

    Last edited by greenmark; 01-08-2013 at 08:42 AM.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by greenmark:
    I really wish that I could find this one article I read that argued convincingly that exercise doesn't help in weight loss.

    Apparently there has only ever been one *longitudinal* study which measured weight loss for a large set of people as they increased their exercise. It was from the 60s and has never been replicated. All other studies show that the proportion of exercisers who lose weight over a sustained period of time is no better than for a control group of non exercisers. The only ones who lose weight are those who strictly control their diets, with average weight loss about the same regardless of whether or not they increase their exercise.

    Key reasons are that exercise makes you hungrier and also more likely to compensate with treats (eg I've run five miles so I am allowed to eat that bacon sandwich).

    Most people tend to think exercise works because those who exercise most tend to be thinner. However that only shows a correlation and doesn't establish causation. It seems quite likely that those who do most exercise do so because they are genetically predisposed to be thin and active.

    That's not to say there aren't plenty of other benefits in doing exercise.
    There was also this buffoon that called himself a Nutritionist whom went on a diet of chocolates and fast food and lost alot of weight over 3 months. Alot of crackpots out there giving out the wrong message.

    It's about diet and controlling what you eat and calorie intake.

    I myself lost over 10 kgs in just over two months in 2008 without exercise and a controlled diet.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by greenmark:
    I really wish that I could find this one article I read that argued convincingly that exercise doesn't help in weight loss.

    Apparently there has only ever been one *longitudinal* study which measured weight loss for a large set of people as they increased their exercise. It was from the 60s and has never been replicated. All other studies show that the proportion of exercisers who lose weight over a sustained period of time is no better than for a control group of non exercisers. The only ones who lose weight are those who strictly control their diets, with average weight loss about the same regardless of whether or not they increase their exercise.
    If you ever manage to find that article, please post it up. It runs counter to my own observations amongst my social circles where the majority of the "fit" and "non-overweight" people I know don't tend control their diets in the slightest. Though they also don't worry about constantly loosing weight, they exercise for fun.

    I'd also be a bit leery of a longitudinal study from the 60s, if that's when it was published. That would mean that the data collection occurred during the 40s (WWII) and 50s (cooking with lard, yum!), and our understanding of nutrition and exercise has come a long way since then. If data collection started in the 60s, that'd be more reassuring.

    Though as you mention, weight alone isn't the whole story. Someone can remain a hundred kilos and be fantastically fit and healthy, and someone else could be a hundred kilos and morbidly obese.
    Last edited by jgl; 01-08-2013 at 10:22 AM.

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl:
    If you ever manage to find that article, please post it up. It runs counter to my own observations amongst my social circles where the majority of the "fit" and "non-overweight" people I know don't tend control their diets in the slightest. Though they also don't worry about constantly loosing weight, they exercise for fun.

    I'd also be a bit leery of a longitudinal study from the 60s, if that's when it was published. That would mean that the data collection occurred during the 40s (WWII) and 50s (cooking with lard, yum!), and our understanding of nutrition and exercise has come a long way since then. If data collection started in the 60s, that'd be more reassuring.

    Though as you mention, weight alone isn't the whole story. Someone can remain a hundred kilos and be fantastically fit and healthy, and someone else could be a hundred kilos and morbidly obese.
    As far as I recall it wasn't a lifetime longitudinal study. Most likely it was a longitudinal study over a few months or yeats.

    Sent from my HTC One 801e using GeoClicks mobile app

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by HowardCoombs:
    I get so hungry after exercise (any exercise) I usually end up eating double&triple what I just burned off.

    Are there any tips, tricks, pills or potions to try to alleviate the post exercise hunger? I've read a few of the suggestions in various magazines but I just cant control it with will power. I *CAN* control the urge for cold beer but not for eating copious quantities after exercise...
    Don't try to control the eating, control WHAT you eat. Eat fruit, veggies, lean meat etc rather than crisps or snacks. You can eat HEAPS of fruit and veggies without getting fat.
    shenwen likes this.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by fth:
    My three cents worth. you need to make a lifestyle change, debating which exercise is better is bs. you want to make a change which is permanent and part of an ongoing lifestyle. These are my tips as someone who smoked 40 a day, drank quite a bit and played the odd football game to nowadays smokes zero, ok still likes beer, but also did a few triathlons last season and cycle 80km a week minimum, plus run and swim a bit every week.

    1. Join a club for a sport you enjoy, and has members you like being around. This can be a hash, footy club, Tri club, hiking group anything. They won't bite you and are a lot cheaper than some PT gym deal. more importantly, you'll enjoy it more.

    2. Mix up the exercise a bit. Focusing on one sport can lead to injuries if you are not careful.

    3. Build up slowly, if there is one thing more expensive than gym and PT fees in HK, try physios.
    I'm going to be in your neck of the woods in September - I probably won't recognise you if we catch up! All good points

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by MovingIn07:
    Don't try to control the eating, control WHAT you eat. Eat fruit, veggies, lean meat etc rather than crisps or snacks. You can eat HEAPS of fruit and veggies without getting fat.
    I'm not that bad - I dont go for sugar/fatty snacks but my problem is carbs. When I get home after a hike, no amount of fruit/veg satisfies me. I crave bread/pasta/rice along with some fish/chicken/meat and its a craving that I find very hard to control.

  10. #40

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    I've done a google looking for longitudinal studies between exercise and weight loss. Seems that maybe I overstated the findings of that previous article. Most seem to suggest that exercise can help a little bit, but even so the major part of weight loss is change in diet

    Here's an article setting out findings from one study.
    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056...&#t=articleTop

    Even so - the results aren't that encouraging - it seems that only those who made huge increases in exercise kept their weight down and not by very much. To quote:
    "Those who exercised less over the course of the study tended to gain weight, while those who increased their activity didn’t. Those with the greatest increase in physical activity gained 1.76 fewer pounds than the rest of the participants within each four-year period."

    Last edited by greenmark; 01-08-2013 at 12:04 PM.
    jgl likes this.

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