Bikefit, rules and bikecomputer

Reply
  1. #1

    Bikefit, rules and bikecomputer

    Morning guys, ladies,

    I’m looking for a Hammerhead Karoo 2. Anybody know where they sell these here in HK?

    Also looking to do a bikefit. Any advise on where to get a proper fit done? Both island and NT are ok.

    Third question: are you allowed to ride your bike on the road where cars drive, including the ‘high way’?


  2. #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    1,979

    There’s a guy in Discovery Bay that does bike fits. Something like bike energy lab is the name.

    Some of the more showroomy bike shops offer this as well, such as Bull Bike, Sky Blue Bike and such.

    I recently did an AI bike fit on a website called myvelofit, cause I’m worried all these shops in HK in the end just want to sell you stuff.

    and you are allowed to drive on most roads. Notable exceptions are tunnels and highways. They should normally be signs of biking is forbidden past a certain point.


  3. #3

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    11,488

    Sky Blue is serious about stuff like fitting, the person who does it is an ex-physio. They don't try to sell you stuff. I'm not a road biker, so never had to use this service though.

    I would not trust the staff at Bull Bike (or most other stores in HK) to fit me on anything.


  4. #4

    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    1,979
    Quote Originally Posted by jgl:
    Sky Blue is serious about stuff like fitting, the person who does it is an ex-physio. They don't try to sell you stuff. I'm not a road biker, so never had to use this service though.

    I would not trust the staff at Bull Bike (or most other stores in HK) to fit me on anything.
    Sky blue gives me really bad vibes. I wanted to buy some component and these guys gave me a speech on how bad supply chains are and they have nothing available bla bla bla. Said they could order it form and would arrive in a few weeks.

    messaged a shop in Kowloon, they just had several in stock, at 10% lower than sky blue.

    recently was looking for new bikes, again sky blue tells you how difficult the market is, nothing in stock. Can order and will arrive in a few months, but they want you to pay upfront.

    again, message a few shops in Kowloon or NT, and they have stuff available, at lower prices. Maybe not Wilier, what sky blue is selling you, but reputable stuff as well.

    To me it feels like sky blue is just living off expat to expat sales and lots of blah blah blah for fairly standard components.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    11,488
    Quote Originally Posted by mucaari:
    Sky blue gives me really bad vibes. I wanted to buy some component and these guys gave me a speech on how bad supply chains are and they have nothing available bla bla bla. Said they could order it form and would arrive in a few weeks.

    messaged a shop in Kowloon, they just had several in stock, at 10% lower than sky blue.

    recently was looking for new bikes, again sky blue tells you how difficult the market is, nothing in stock. Can order and will arrive in a few months, but they want you to pay upfront.

    again, message a few shops in Kowloon or NT, and they have stuff available, at lower prices. Maybe not Wilier, what sky blue is selling you, but reputable stuff as well.

    To me it feels like sky blue is just living off expat to expat sales and lots of blah blah blah for fairly standard components.
    Fair enough. It's run by Westerners, so they are probably not as plugged in to the local way of going things, which is sometimes a bit under the table or relationship-based.

    And yeah, their market is clearly Western roadie.

    On the other hand, because they are Western and a bit obsessive about the 'right' way of doing things, I've found they are good on bike service. I've had some semi-unbelievably bad mechanical work done around different stores in Hong Kong, and this is one of the few places I'd trust to do things right instead of half-assing it. No way would I trust any of the other 'known' stores with a bike fit, which requires an understanding of biomechanics. Certainly not Bull- those clowns will recommend things like helmets based purely on "more expensive=bettah."

    If I'm trying to buy hardware, they would not be on my list. Because I'm not looking for handmade Italian carbon frames, and I can find standard Shimano components cheaper in the New Territories.
    Last edited by jgl; 29-06-2022 at 11:17 AM.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    1,979
    Quote Originally Posted by jgl:
    Fair enough. It's run by Westerners, so they are probably not as plugged in to the local way of going things, which is sometimes a bit under the table or relationship-based.

    On the other hand, because they are Western and a bit obsessive about the 'right' way of doing things, I've found they are good on bike service. I've had some semi-unbelievably bad mechanical work done around different stores in Hong Kong, and this is one of the few places I'd trust to do things right instead of half-assing it.

    If I'm trying to buy hardware, they would not be on my list. Because I'm not looking for handmade Italian carbon frames, and I can find standard Shimano components cheaper in the New Territories.
    Yea agree. Local shops might sometimes treat selling a bike like selling a bag of rice.

    Nonetheless, bike mechanics is relatively easy, so it might be easier to just buy a set of tools, and watch youtube tutorials to be able to do most service yourselves. Maybe not bottom bracket or headset repairs or replacements, but most other things are fine to do at home with few tools and a bit of tutorials.

    And Bullbike being a bit shit is true as well. Nonetheless, I bought from them several times, if I needed small things like a new pump or wrench. Just don't ask them for advice. They are relatively well stocked and prices aren't too bad for those things.

    Great shop to buy tools and components is Aurora Bike somewhere in Kwai Chung. They have lots of stuff at relatively good prices. It's just out of the way.
    Last edited by mucaari; 29-06-2022 at 11:25 AM.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    11,488
    Quote Originally Posted by mucaari:
    Nonetheless, bike mechanics is relatively easy, so it might be easier to just buy a set of tools, and watch youtube tutorials to be able to do most service yourselves. Maybe not bottom bracket or headset repairs or replacements, but most other things are fine to do at home with few tools and a bit of tutorials.

    And Bullbike being a bit shit is true as well. Nonetheless, I bought from them several times, if I needed small things like a new pump or wrench. Just don't ask them for advice. They are relatively well stocked and prices aren't too bad for those things.
    I built wheels and replaced bottom brackets. I draw the line at anything that involves hydraulics- brake lines and shock systems. But the good thing about HK is that you can still find competent mechanics quite inexpensively, so storing a set of tools and workstand is no longer necessary, and frankly I have plenty of other things to do with my time, like post on Geo.

    Is Bull owned by... Iron Ore (or Iron something), the big bike parts distributor based up in NT? I can't remember.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,235

    Wun Pang Bicycle in Long Ping (Yuen Long) does bike fitting, they have a dedicated room just for that, having said that I have not used their service myself, just seen it in use when shopping there before.

    https://wunpangbicycle.com/index.php?route=common/home