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Installing a ceiling light - what do I need to borrow?

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  1. #31

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    Aug 2006
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    9,666

    mult-post.


  2. #32

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    9,666

    Good cordless drills will cost multiples of what one with a cord will cost. And the batteries do not last forever even if unused.

    If you're not using a drill every week, for hours on end, get a corded drill.

    Should I just go cordless because if the fuse box is off then I'd have to run a super long extension cord to another room in the house because I won't have any juice in that room?

    Lights probably run off a different circuit to wall sockets. Only one way to find out

    imparanoic likes this.

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by chichow
    Should I just go cordless
    NO SDS Corded - see the video below. Hot knife butter

    https://youtu.be/JWrWdMSm2pQ

    Quote Originally Posted by chichow
    or am I better off going to Sham Shui Po?
    Around 191- 259 Apliu St.

    https://www.google.com/maps/@22.3304...7i13312!8i6656

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    2,886

    Borrowed a BOSCH

    hot butter - drilling done in 2 minutes
    actual drilling time 15 seconds

    drumbrake, East_coast, jgl and 3 others like this.

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Finished product

    my own moon - it’s actually not as bright as I would like so off to Tao b to order some lighting


  6. #36

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Tsim Sha Tsui
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    Saw this thread late, should have sent me a PM, I have a Makita hammer drill.

    Looking at the 1st photo with the previous lighting pulled down, it doesn't look like concrete at all, and some light taps with your knuckles will tell you if it is solid (concrete) or hollow (plasterboard).

    If you don't have a wire detector, try and glimpse through the hole where the wires come out to get a general direction of which way the wiring goes, and then drill perpendicular to the direction. Alternatively, find which direction your fusebox is and drill perpendicular to that. This minimises the risk of cutting the electrical wire partly or completely, reducing risk of electrocution and having to rewire the ceiling.

    For ceiling lights (or anything that hangs from the ceiling) in plasterboard I normally avoid those anchors, there are metal clasp you can get that you pole through the hole and then clasps the sides with a hole in the middle for screws.

    chichow likes this.

  7. #37

    Join Date
    Jun 2016
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    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCra...ec67xl9FEPndtw

    If you want to learn how do stuff around your crib (home) and on your ride (car), watch her videos. Very good stuff IMO.

  8. #38

    Join Date
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  9. #39

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    2,886
    Quote Originally Posted by Proplus
    Saw this thread late, should have sent me a PM, I have a Makita hammer drill.

    Looking at the 1st photo with the previous lighting pulled down, it doesn't look like concrete at all, and some light taps with your knuckles will tell you if it is solid (concrete) or hollow (plasterboard).

    If you don't have a wire detector, try and glimpse through the hole where the wires come out to get a general direction of which way the wiring goes, and then drill perpendicular to the direction. Alternatively, find which direction your fusebox is and drill perpendicular to that. This minimises the risk of cutting the electrical wire partly or completely, reducing risk of electrocution and having to rewire the ceiling.

    For ceiling lights (or anything that hangs from the ceiling) in plasterboard I normally avoid those anchors, there are metal clasp you can get that you pole through the hole and then clasps the sides with a hole in the middle for screws.

    Felt hard though and dead sound

    closer pic


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