View Poll Results: Allow foreign doctors & nurses to work in HK?

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  • Yes

    18 85.71%
  • No

    3 14.29%
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Allow foreign doctors & nurses to work in HK?

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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by merchantms
    Pre-1997 the people who ran the HK government were all foreign as well!
    May be not "all foreign".

    HK has a long history of local civil servants.

    HA has had local CE/Chairmen since its inception in the 90s.

    Lots of vested interests in keeping foreign (more importantly Mainland doctors out of HK)..

    The medical profession is honestly not that worried about English speakers. Unfortunately they know that they cannot allow foreign qualifications to be recognised and not have China on that list. This prevents them from doing anything...

    Meanwhile, Hong Kong Medical Association president Choi Kin, a vocal opponent of the reforms, recently armed himself with poll findings indicating 65 percent of doctors are prepared to join a protest against the proposed changes. The association canvassed 13,000 doctors, but only 15 percent responded.

    Therefore, Choi's support rests on 65 percent of the 15 percent replying, which is hardly representative.

    A fear factor the opponents have played up is people's apprehension that if the doors are opened to overseas practitioners, it could result in an influx of mainland doctors.

    That's a smart strategy, for they know it would be politically inconvenient for SAR officials to deny this openly.

    But according to the administration, the fact remains not a single mainland- trained doctor has been admitted to local public hospitals.

    While the message may be subtle, the denial can't be any clearer.

    For sure, the opponents will continue with the fear mongering to sway public opinion, as the bill is deliberated by lawmakers - even though such fears aren't necessarily based on the truth.
    Culture of fear behind medical reform - The Standard
    merchantms and hongkong7 like this.

  2. #32

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    @shri

    The medical profession honestly not that worried about English speakers. Unfortunately they know that they cannot allow foreign qualifications to be recognised and not have China on that list. This prevents them from doing anything...
    Yes my understanding is that it's all about China (and to a lesser degree other Asian countries) and nothing to do with Europeans or Americans.

    They fear a medical system consisting of mainland Chinese doctors and Filipina nurses.
    MABinPengChau and hongkong7 like this.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by East_coast
    That is not what was suggested. Reciprocal agreements should reflect any differences in systems.

    So your argument is English Speaking but not instructuction in the medium of English Doctors that can't speak Cantonese should get preferential treatment over better qualified candidates if they are ethnically Chinese?
    The argument is very simple. Preferential treatment should be given to HK residents. Part of the quality of care and qualifications is to be able to communicate with patients in the home language. A question that was never answered, would you want a doctor that didn't speak English? I bet that the answer is that an extremely large portion of expats would say no. I also bet that given the sane question in the UK or any English speaking country, the vast majority would also answer no. If there comes a time when public hospitals could not provide a cantonese speaking doctor to a patient if requested, that would be in my opinion a terrible situation.

    There is a difference between ethnicity and citizenship... If a HK resident speaks English and cantonese, ethnicity has nothing to do with it. The same goes with China, HK will likely eventually become a chinese city, if there's a shortage then recruitment should start within the same country. If an ethnically chinese applicant doesn't speak cantonese and is not a resident of HK/China then he/she should get the same treatment as any foreigner. That is exactly what happens in the EU, no one there will hire me unless there are no EU citizen available to do the work. Same in Australia or NZ, there has to be evidence that the job was advertised and that no local qualified applicant were available before a visa is granted. Been there, done that. It should be the same between HK and China. Where on the planet are the most qualified people hired over local people? Obviously there are many in HK that are afraid of the China door opening but that's what should and will happen eventually. HK is now part of China and it will be integrated bit by bit.
    hongkong7 likes this.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by merchantms
    @shri

    Yes my understanding is that it's all about China (and to a lesser degree other Asian countries) and nothing to do with Europeans or Americans.

    They fear a medical system consisting of mainland Chinese doctors and Filipina nurses.
    A lot of Filipino nurses are male, just to correct that stereotype.
    shri and traineeinvestor like this.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by shri
    May be not "all foreign".

    HK has a long history of local civil servants.

    HA has had local CE/Chairmen since its inception in the 90s.

    Lots of vested interests in keeping foreign (more importantly Mainland doctors out of HK)..

    The medical profession is honestly not that worried about English speakers. Unfortunately they know that they cannot allow foreign qualifications to be recognised and not have China on that list. This prevents them from doing anything...



    Culture of fear behind medical reform - The Standard
    Spot on : essentially it boils down to this : if there is a Singapore style preferred list of universities medical graduate that can practice here such as say Sydney , Harvard , Toronto , Delhi , London then how could they leave Beijing off the list ?
    The fear is opening the flood gate to the Chinese speaking latter.
    And as someone else pointed out for almost all medical work in public excepting some and only some anaesthetic pathology fluent written and spoken Chinese is essential .
    As mainland patients now make up a significant section of hospital patients every doctor will need to read reams of mainland Chinese generated medical reports etc etc on a daily basis
    Doctors here aren't to concerned about competing with non mainland grads they have for years via the licentiate scheme : it's the limitless mainland supply and to a certain extent the mainland medical culture which is driving the present stance
    Last edited by hongkong7; 20-01-2020 at 08:14 AM.
    Coolboy likes this.

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by hongkong7
    Spot on : essentially it boils down to this : if there is a Singapore style preferred list of universities medical graduate that can practice here such as say Sydney , Harvard , Toronto , Delhi , London then how could they leave Beijing off the list ?
    The fear is opening the flood gates to the Chinese speaking latter.
    And as someone else pointed out for almost all medical work in public excepting some and only some anaesthetic. pathology etc fluent written and spoken Chinese is essential .
    Mainland patients now make up a very significant section of hospital patients (and many return to visit Hong Kong only to see their doctors get there medication and return to the mainland )every doctor will need to read reams of mainland Chinese generated medical reports etc etc on a daily basis
    Non fluent Chinese doctors cannot work effectively in front line roles in present day Hong Kong
    Last edited by hongkong7; 20-01-2020 at 08:11 AM.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by hongkong7
    certain extent the mainland medical culture which is driving the present stance
    This is the biggest dilemma. Few in HK have much trust and confidence in mainland doctors and the medical system that trains them. This may not be entirely fair. There are highly professional and skilled doctors on the mainland. The problem is, there also many unprofessional doctors of questionable competence. The average patient in HK simply would not know what kind of mainland doctor they would be getting if they are allowed to flood HK and practice here. This uncertainty and lack of reliability in mainland doctors is the main stumbling block.

    But rather than solve this issue, the local HK doctors and their medical professional bodies use this fear to maintain their currently closed shop status. I mean yes, a few foreign trained doctors are allowed to practice in HK each year after passing a fiendishly difficult set of exams, where the passing rate is very very low, but this hardly resolves the issue given the small number of doctors admitted to practice in HK.
    Last edited by Coolboy; 20-01-2020 at 04:49 PM.
    hongkong7 likes this.

  8. #38

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    Deleted double post.


  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Golem
    Obviously there are many in HK that are afraid of the China door opening but that's what should and will happen eventually. HK is now part of China and it will be integrated bit by bit.
    Why should it happen when nobody wants it to?

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