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Political commentary and analysis on Wuhan flu and Chinese response

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  1. #1

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    Lightbulb Political commentary and analysis on Wuhan flu and Chinese response

    https://www.newstatesman.com/world/a...tralised-model

    Starting a new thread so those looking for news won’t feel the Wuflu thread is cluttered by less health-related discussions.

    I think the article shows it’s still sad days ahead for reform-minded Chinese. Civil society won’t be regrown, a more muscular state will still always be seen as the solution (at least by the state itself).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coolboy
    Heck, even the SCMP sees fit to criticize the passive reaction of the HK government to the virus. It is really indicative of the state of the HK government that even Macau, normally looked down upon by HK, takes better and more proactive action than the Lam administration:

    Government passivity has returned with the Wuhan coronavirus. We’ve already had our Article 23 moment with the extradition bill that sparked the protests last year and was also withdrawn. But, unlike in 2003, there have been no resignations or admission of failings by Lam or her top officials. Waiting for Beijing to give orders or even following the lead of Macau is no way for a city that claims to be of international importance to deal with crises...Hong Kong has lurched from one calamity to another and it needs leadership that can respond positively to public sentiment and citizens’ needs. Just like the rat, we need officials who are intelligent and deft.


    https://www.scmp.com/comment/opinion...passive-leader
    Peter Kammerer has actually generally been sympathetic to the protests, the sympathy only being strained at the height of the clashes around November.
    You can contrast his response to that of Alice Wu, who has been critical of the performance of the Carrie Lam administration since the extradition bill protests, but has called for unity (no difference between yellow and blue) in the face of the crisis. No problem with that, except it conveniently glosses over who started the divide (pro-Beijing people firing people who are sympathetic to the protests) and who has more power in terms of delivering punitive results in the absence of organising counter-measures.

    You have to look at the individuals behind the writing, not just the organisation (which based on the unnamed editorials, and more prominence being given to government viewpoints, has certain obvious bias).

    It has not reached the point (and in fact is quite far from that) where they completely exclude different viewpoints from their bias. After all, they are not state media and do need to maintain some credibility.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AsianXpat0

    You have to look at the individuals behind the writing, not just the organisation (which based on the unnamed editorials, and more prominence being given to government viewpoints, has certain obvious bias).

    It has not reached the point (and in fact is quite far from that) where they completely exclude different viewpoints from their bias. After all, they are not state media and do need to maintain some credibility.
    I didn't ignored the individual columnists, as for excluding opposing viewpoints, yes, they haven't excluded them entirely, but I can see a pattern of them being increasingly more restrictive of people who advocate for different viewpoints than the pro-establishment ones. They will throw out on occasional a more neutral or even more pro-democracy leaning opinion to show they are still a nominally independent paper, but that doesn't change the fact most of their opinions are pro-government or pro-Beijing leaning. So in that sense it is indeed telling that the SCMP allow this to be published. That does say a lot.
    Last edited by Coolboy; 28-01-2020 at 11:19 AM.
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    The WHO are the true villains here

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    Quote Originally Posted by jw1701
    The WHO are the true villains here
    https://mobile.twitter.com/alvinllum...79822454272001

    Was that (and the accompanying social commentary that the WHO has seen China’s influence increase within it) what you were referring to?
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  8. #8

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    I think this is a very good description:

    “China is a much more decentralized place than it appears,” said David Cowhig, a former American diplomat who served 10 years in China and monitored health and science issues.“Local officials have great discretion; China is a coalition of ‘little’ Big Brothers,” he said. “Xi realizes this and is trying to re-centralize China.”
    Here is hoping that the Hong Kong government reads and understand this - most probably in vain.

    “The truth is in a public-health emergency, it’s not just the medical professionals who matter,” Mr. McGregor said. “It’s the management of it in the government and in the public that matters, too. It’s hard to argue that they’ve done that well.”
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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by jw1701
    The WHO are the true villains here
    Yeah where the hell have they been? shouldn't they have been flying in and telling Lam : hey you need to do this this and this : since even a lot of know nothing's on geo early on sensed this was not going to be some sort of flu+

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