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Ban on Alcohol Sales @ Licensed Premises - Proposed or Happening?

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  1. #121

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    Quote Originally Posted by stickyears
    They are mostly on Ketamine instead. It's only recently that under 18s were banned from buying booze in HK because they never have been interested.

    Booze has never been big in Asia due to evolution. The Chinese learnt early on that boiling water made it safe to drink. Europeans, learning from the Middle East, found brewing beer had the same effect.

    Is there a theory on why a country like South Korea is an exception to this? Japan too maybe (although to the same extent as Korea).

  2. #122

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    Quote Originally Posted by stickyears
    Of course I have, but look how little alcohol a Japanese or Korean have to consume to appear flushed and give up. Asians cannot metabolize alcohol for the evolutionary reason I gave. GIve it a few 100s of years more evolution and all will be more equal.

    Also maybe their armpit sweat will smell and they'll get wet earwax as well. Lots to look forward to
    Eh? Koreans drink like fish. We're talking 8+ hour sessions, no skipping rounds, spirts and beer mixed throughout the night, multiple times a week, and expecting to be in work the next day (granted, this tradition is dying out, 10+ years ago still very much the norm).
    mrgoodkat, rs4, Skyhook and 2 others like this.

  3. #123

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kowloon72
    Eh? Koreans drink like fish. We're talking 8+ hour sessions, no skipping rounds, spirts and beer mixed throughout the night, multiple times a week, and expecting to be in work the next day (granted, this tradition is dying out, 10+ years ago still very much the norm).
    All of the Koreans I've ever drunk with (or Japanense or Mainland Chinese) have gone flushed then fallen over, disappeared for a vomit (or a shag) or passed out once or more during the session. That was also 10+ years ago as well done in anger, less these days.
    bbchris likes this.

  4. #124

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    Quote Originally Posted by stickyears
    Of course I have, but look how little alcohol a Japanese or Korean have to consume to appear flushed and give up.
    East_coast likes this.

  5. #125

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    It is very rare for Expats to face racism in Hong Kong. HK locals, typically are very warm towards Expats.

    HK'ers are very direct. When you are typically called a Gwai Lo, it's more of a term of endearment.

    Wearing a mask in HK is a cultural / preventative measure.

    If you don't wear a mask, expect weird glances, regardless if you're a local or expat....

    When in Rome, do what Romans do...

    Use of facemasks
    https://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...134-X/fulltext

    https://www.who.int/emergencies/dise...w-to-use-masks

    Chinese in UK, USA, whether emigrated or born/bred in these countries typically endure constant verbal derogatory abuse:-

    Chink, Chinky, Ching Chong Chinaman, Egg Foo Yung, Sweet & Sour Pork, Special flied lice....

    With the Covid19, Chinese worldwide endure abuse and physical attacks. If there's a wiki page for racism derived from Covid19, then that shows how bad it is...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...virus_pandemic

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-51771355


  6. #126

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    Surely they need to get this legislation in place before the weekend?


  7. #127

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    Quote Originally Posted by ArrynField
    It is very rare for Expats to face racism in Hong Kong. HK locals, typically are very warm towards Expats.
    Disagree... The problem is that many seem to think that racism must equate hate. Racism is having a prejudice against a race that often stems from a belief of superiority. That your race is better than another. It doesn't have to lead to hate. I think that many if not most expats on here believe themselves better than the local populace which often comes through in posts whether it's about manners or levels of English or being better drinkers or a variety of other things... How often have I heard expats say that local HKers are racists which in itself is a racist statement or even better, I am not racists, I have friends who are... which is irrelevant. Many HKer also come through as believing themselves better than expat in a variety of stereotyped situation like work ethic, study habits, discipline etc...

    Racism is a fact of life in multicultural societies, no one likes the label and very few accept the fact that virtually everyone has biases and say or do things that are racists. That doesn't mean it has to be hateful or malicious, it's simply human. An easy test is to ask yourself if you would say a particular thing to the face of someone of that race and whether that might be well received.
    Kowloon72 likes this.

  8. #128

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    I'm just commenting that the degree of racism faced by Chinese abroad is not to the same level experienced by Expats in HK....

    IMO some HK'ers are typically more xenophobic towards their counterparts over the border and more friendly towards Expats.


  9. #129

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    I've experienced negative racism in Hong Kong. It doesn't 'bother' me, but I'm sure the term 'Gweilo' is racist... aside from the fact that, despite how I look, I'm not a 'gweilo' by some definitions, it's certainly derogatory in some contexts.

    On several occasions I have been quoted higher prices than my local friends. I suspect this has probably happened many more times than I'm aware of.

    Again, this doesn't bother me, but many times I've been asked, "Where are you from?"... so I say, "Tuen Mun!"... "Where are you really from?"... I don't actually have a problem with that but I'm reliably informed that people who ask that are literally Hitler.

    I can't buy shoes in my size and the shopkeepers think it's hilarious!
    Before you ask, sadly, in my case, big shoes simply means big feet...

    People ask me if I can use chopsticks or they're amazed when they see me using them.

    Local people who I have known for over 10 years still feel the need to tell me, "This is Hong Kong."... I'm 'othered'... (I think that's right.).

    The Principal at the local school I work at introduces me to everyone as American... I've worked there for 10 years, I'm British.

    A police officer who was harassing us for street performing berated me, "You foreigners!"... I pointed out that I am a PR and had been here for over a decade... "Can you speak Cantonese?", he shouted back at me angrily.

    A landlord once refused to rent a house to me when he found out I was 'western'.

    Just what I can think of off the top of my head... oh yeah, the whole pushing in between me and my family thing, or being asked for my ticket at the cinema even though my (Chinese) wife has just showed them two... I believe these are called 'micro-aggressions'...

    On the other hand, security guards offer me little resistance and I've been waved on by police after being pulled over for various minor driving indiscretions...


  10. #130

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aramis

    Racism is a fact of life in multicultural societies, no one likes the label and very few accept the fact that virtually everyone has biases and say or do things that are racists. .
    I think racism/discrimination/sexism/patriarchal or matriarchal bias etc, is more overtly prevalent in Homogeneous societies. Hence why the term, when in Rome, do as Romans do, applied.
    Politics aside....
    Multi-Cultural societies generally have made a lot of progress (effort) legally speaking at dealing with racism, sexism, equal opportunity and anti discrimination etc.

    In Hong Kong’s case the racism is of the positive type vexed at Faan Gwei, as we are perceived as being walking wallets full of cash, ergo tolerated. I was told by a drunken local once that, ‘ I must live on The Peak and Earn more than a million HKD ‘ lol as per the traditional stereotype.

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