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Shocking death - Hiker Struck by Lightning

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  1. #31

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    Salt water doesn't conduct electricity well?

    You add salt to distilled or tap water if you want to put a charge to it (only reason I can think of this is science class).

    This thread has been getting pretty weird though
    @HK_Katherine, I didn't realise until today that there are lightning detectors.


  2. #32

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    In nature versus humans nature invariably wins. The only success humans have is destructive. From what I can determine the storm warning had already been raised, please correct me if I’m wrong. If so then however tragic this could have been avoided.


  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl:
    Salt water doesn't conduct electricity well?

    You add salt to distilled or tap water if you want to put a charge to it (only reason I can think of this is science class).

    This thread has been getting pretty weird though
    @HK_Katherine, I didn't realise until today that there are lightning detectors.
    Yes, they are quite cheap - I think i got mine on Amazon. About the size of a mobile phone. They detect lightening within a certain radius (not with mine, can't recall) and then beep to let you know if you are hiking so you can change route/take shelter etc.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Irish Man:
    That's simply not true

    Of course hiking in thunderstorms is more dangerous than swimming

    Salt water doesn't conduct electricity very well, therefore it's not that high a risk

    The sea is at sea level,once you get out of the water, you're on low ground,which is low risk

    Lightning detectors don't stop you from being electrocuted!If you're unlucky enough to be on a high mountain when a thunderstorm comes, you're in a far worse position because you're so high above sea level, it's one of the worst places to be

    It's funny that you said there's no risk when we're in a thread talking about someone getting killed by lightning


    If there's no risk then why carry lightning detectors?
    In short, if you are hiking then the lightening has to hit YOU to hurt you. If you are swimming, it just has to hit the WATER near you.

    https://poolfence.com/safe-to-swim-during-thunderstorm/



  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by HK_Katherine:
    In short, if you are hiking then the lightening has to hit YOU to hurt you. If you are swimming, it just has to hit the WATER near you.

    https://poolfence.com/safe-to-swim-during-thunderstorm/


    Not really true, but partially true.

    You can get hit by a side flash - E.g hits a tree you're standing under, and the charge partially arcs across space (normally not more than a foot or two) to hit something else.

    You can also get hit by ground current - The ground around said tree becomes charged and in fact this is the way one is most likely to be killed or injured by lightening, because the catchment area is greater than the likelihood of a direct strike

    There are even cases of people getting 'hit' inside their own home - Touching some conductor (e.g. a kitchen tap) when the building is hit - So @Irish Man 's stern warnings about the dangers of Hiking, really also need to include some warnings about staying inside as well.

    But of course the much greater conductivity of surface water, and greater still of surface salt water (and the fact that you are far more likely to be the highest object in a large radius) makes water borne 'ground current' a bigger risk.
    Last edited by Sage; 03-08-2022 at 12:26 PM.
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  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by HK_Katherine:
    In short, if you are hiking then the lightening has to hit YOU to hurt you.
    Not exactly. The voltage drop from the few 100mio volts alone can hurt, specially when walking. Best is to look for cover - but not single trees. Overgrown area is fine. A direct hit might be difficult to survive. The current will bring your blood instantly to a boiling point. That won't be fun.

    This said, really too rare to worry about it.

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  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by ByeByeEngland:
    In nature versus humans nature invariably wins. The only success humans have is destructive. From what I can determine the storm warning had already been raised, please correct me if I’m wrong. If so then however tragic this could have been avoided.
    There's a warning up right now and here are the, incongruous, radar:

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    So just stay in all day? How is one supposed to make a determination with regards to risk of a severe lightning storm? Back home there would first be a severe thunderstorm "watch" (orange=maybe) raised, this would be followed by a severe thunderstorm "warning" (red=happening). Small isolated storms usually don't prompt these warnings. Here HKO just stick a warning up on the site and forget about it to absolve themselves of any responsibility.

  8. #38

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    Three tourists killed across the street from the White House (DC area thunderstorms are no joke):

    https://twitter.com/LindsayAWatts/st...182020876.html


  9. #39

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sage:
    Not really true, but partially true.

    You can get hit by a side flash - E.g hits a tree you're standing under, and the charge partially arcs across space (normally not more than a foot or two) to hit something else.

    You can also get hit by ground current - The ground around said tree becomes charged and in fact this is the way one is most likely to be killed or injured by lightening, because the catchment area is greater than the likelihood of a direct strike

    There are even cases of people getting 'hit' inside their own home - Touching some conductor (e.g. a kitchen tap) when the building is hit - So @Irish Man 's stern warnings about the dangers of Hiking, really also need to include some warnings about staying inside as well.

    But of course the much greater conductivity of surface water, and greater still of surface salt water (and the fact that you are far more likely to be the highest object in a large radius) makes water borne 'ground current' a bigger risk.
    I never issued a stern warning,my original point was that I personally prefer not to hike in summer,and prefer to do so in winter.


    Anyway, hiking in HK is totally safe and there's no risk whatsoever LOL

    Just leaving this here:

    Google translate if you can't reas Chinese (I can but I don't like to brag)

    https://www.hk01.com/%E5%8D%B3%E6%99...BD%9F%E5%8B%95

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