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Educating Kids in Hong Kong

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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by 7jai:
    Thanks Shri, I will take a look at these balance sheets. It's just astonishing how these costs have grown over the years. I get the facilities are much better and more advanced, but I just can't wrap my head around it. Like I said, I'm new to this game, so please bare with my ignorance on this subject lol
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    More here: https://www.kellettschool.com/upload...GM.pdf?noembed
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  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl:
    Isn't that essentially the same here? Perhaps not codified, but when you have openly racist high level politicians, explicit codification doesn't even seem like a step further.
    I can only say speaking to Indian colleagues and friends in both places, in Singapore it’s a big problem especially for professionals. Singaporeans view Indians as competition for those white collar jobs. It’s not the same dynamic in HK due to language.
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  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by merchantms:
    Singaporeans view Indians as competition for those white collar jobs. It’s not the same dynamic in HK due to language.
    Singapore has a weird schizo thing going for it.

    Singaporean-Chinese.. they're oh-so-politically correct in some aspects ... until you get a peek at their social media groups.

    But ... ditto for Singaporean-Indians too ... Everyone passive-aggressively hates each others guts, because they are better than the other group.

    Both the groups will then stab you in the face and kick you in the balls if you suggest that they hate each other, because the party line is 'we're integrated'.

    I think the kids are more mature about this ... but then I don't have any significant data points there other than some friend's kids who seem well adjusted and open minded.
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  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by merchantms:
    I can only say speaking to Indian colleagues and friends in both places, in Singapore it’s a big problem especially for professionals. Singaporeans view Indians as competition for those white collar jobs. It’s not the same dynamic in HK due to language.
    I hadn't thought about it from the language aspect at all. Makes sense.
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  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by shri:
    I think the kids are more mature about this ... but then I don't have any significant data points there other than some friend's kids who seem well adjusted and open minded.
    This is the norm everywhere I think. Children start off colour blind and only develop less desirable thoughts and views as they grow up and take on more views from parents, cultural references, life experiences etc.
    shri likes this.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by jgl:
    AFAIK, international schools follow foreign curricula. Why would a government that is dead set on reforming national education policy also actively encourage parents to get out of this policy for foreign ones?

    Maybe some schools have government ties, I don't follow this either. I don't see how it really affects things much though. These school populations are miniscule compared to local schools.

    As I said, ESF was subsidised years ago, this vanished. ESF was initially set up to provide education to English speaking residents, but the student population has totally changed as most of the students from what I have seen are native Cantonese or Mandarin speakers, and entry requirements have been recently biased towards local residents.

    From the tiny amount I've seen of how they operate (as a parent, and via friends who work in the system), some of these schools are really expensive to run. Without huge subsidies, I don't see how they are 'extorting' parents... private education without massive government subsidies is just hugely expensive to operate.

    Edit: To be fair, some of these schools are definitely run to make profit. Nord Anglia is part of a group that's listed on an exchange.
    Isn't ESF required by the EDB to have 70% non-local students?

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolguy88:
    Isn't ESF required by the EDB to have 70% non-local students?
    Define non-local

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolguy88:
    Isn't ESF required by the EDB to have 70% non-local students?
    As @shri alludes to. My observation is that at our kid's school, the vast majority of ESF students are local, where the family also holds a foreign passport. Native home languages are predominantly Cantonese or Mandarin, certainly not English (from the name English Schools Foundation).

    It's for parents who want a non local curriculum option, that will give their kids English fluency.

    Mind you, this is a data point, observed from my visits and my interactions around the bus stop. Other schools in other ESF catchment areas could be skewed differently.

  9. #29

    Well, non-HK passport holders. So even taking into account the locals with foreign passports, majority of students would be actual foreigners, no?


  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolguy88:
    Well, non-HK passport holders. So even taking into account the locals with foreign passports, majority of students would be actual foreigners, no?
    Majority are .. the 70% threshold is relaxed and flexible

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