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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by freeier
    XJP has spoken to the tycoons and told them pretty much what is expected of them.. the advertisements are but a start.. how much more control will he cedes to the business man will be an interesting point to study over the next 5-10 years
    Unfortunately for us the election system is structured in a way that ensures the government, and thus the CCP, need the oligarchs and vested interests about as much as the other way around.

  2. #12

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    Mar 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coolboy
    We can see this effect in the occupation preferences as well. The smartest and most "elite" students predominantly end up in only a very narrow spectrum of professions, namely medical doctor and lawyers. Those are seen as "safe" professions so the vast majority of those high scoring DSE candidates end up either in medical or law schools. Yes, you will get the occasional political science, engineering or business major in the group of top scorers, but most end up being lawyers and doctors.

    Now I respect both professionals (doctors more than lawyers if having to choose between the two), as both provide essential services to the well-being of society. But it is strange and indication of a problem in society when almost all the smartest kids end up becoming doctor and lawyers. The question is why. Their reply is often that both professions are seen as relatively "safe". When asked if they like those jobs, they often shrug their shoulders and either give a not-so-convincing "yes I do" or "no, but I need to earn a living".

    That last answer is telling because it reflects a perception that there is a lack of opportunity in the city to support a wide spectrum of jobs. If you think about it, this is potentially a great loss to society. Say student X is a gifted artist and could have become a successful artist, but is told that there is no future for such a profession in this city. Or student Y is a talented violinist who is likewise told there is no opportunity for her. Who knows, maybe there is another Warren Buffett or Jeff Bezos in HK but their entrepreneurial talent is never discovered because they are told to follow a safe profession instead.

    And why is there such a perception over a lack of opportunities outside a few narrow fields? Because the cartels seem to squeeze all other opportunities out of HK, through high rent, monopolistic control over many sectors and collusion with policymakers. Coupled with the government's low R&D investment and you end up with a innovation-limited economy strangled increasingly by these vested interest.
    I noticed this as well, even when growing up, Chinese (and indian) parents tend to push their kids into these safe professions like being a Dr, lawyer, accountant. And they all seem so proud of their kids who achieve it.

    Theres very few role models for HK kids to be in anything creative or different. Plenty of lawyers, drs and accountants who have good salaries and decent lifestyles. For these creative jobs, you are either at the top or struggling. Andre Fu? Antonio Lai? Vivienne Tam? Who else?

    Even for performance artists, theres no real route for regular HK people except going to Miss HK. It seems most of the contestants enter that to become some TVB "star" rather than anything more worthwhile.

    To start something like a business is very different to having good grades. Book smart and street smart... most book smart people can do very well passing all the exams needed to be a decent dr, lawyer or accountant.
    Coolboy likes this.

  3. #13

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    Aug 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMDNC
    What's insane is the same companies controling housing also control the retail places where people shop entertain and eat. So out of one dollar of income the lions share probably ends up in thier coffers. Also, HK promotes a low tax rate hence part of the illusion of this place being free wheeling capitalist but people are taxed indirectly via high housing costs. A big bite of that is taken by the property companies with the rest going to the government. Seems like a shitty setup to me and obviously is given the huge wealth gap seen here. Xie's comments about nano flats were funny but sadly true.
    So greater democracy is the answer?

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