View Poll Results: how to solve the housing problems in Hong Kong?

Voters
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  • Government should stop selling lands to the highest bidders

    7 30.43%
  • Abolish small house policy of the New Territories

    9 39.13%
  • Beef up Lands Resumption Ordinance

    10 43.48%
  • Revitalise industrial buildings

    10 43.48%
  • Reinstate Rent Control

    4 17.39%
  • Capital Gains Tax for real estate transactions

    5 21.74%
  • Building more artificial islands

    5 21.74%
  • Reclamations

    3 13.04%
  • Review Landlord and Tenancy (Consolidation) Ordinance

    0 0%
  • Hong Kong is too crowded; review immigration policy

    11 47.83%
  • End crony capitalism

    6 26.09%
  • None of the above; please specify

    2 8.70%
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how to solve the housing problems in Hong Kong?

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  1. #61

    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Posts
    447
    Quote Originally Posted by AsianXpat0
    The Dutch situation is complex.
    - for low rent income (this is generally the real problem), there is subsidised housing and rent control. There are many social housing projects, but generally it's not enough, so you might be on a long waiting list if you are trying to leave mom and dad, or if you live in a student town, etc.
    - for people with higher income, there is still some protection for renters, but less control. Still, there is also a huge demand for these houses/apartments.

    So the rent control absolutely helps in a difficult situation, but it's also definitely not a cure-all. Rent in Amsterdam is actually in the top-5 of the world (with HK and New York); but if you are prepared to travel a bit more, you can get affordable housing.

    So this is why these links/articles are not necessarily contradictory. Yes, there is rent control and it helps to some extent. Yes, there is a housing shortage. Yes, it's a case of Eurocommiesocialism. On the other hand, there are no living coffins, and I think we can all agree that at least is a good thing.
    AsianXpat0 and nivek2046 like this.

  2. #62

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    691

    @shri, is it possible to add two more options to the poll?

    (3) Developing Brownfield sites
    (4) Tapping into Private Agricultural Land Reserve in the NewTerritories


  3. #63

    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
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    1,038
    Quote Originally Posted by nivek2046
    @shri, is it possible to add two more options to the poll?

    (3) Developing Brownfield sites
    (4) Tapping into Private Agricultural Land Reserve in the NewTerritories
    I would say that your (3) is covered by the Land Resumption Ordinance and the revitalise industrial buildings options.

  4. #64

    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Posts
    447

    I also realised that a large part of this is all about long term planning, not something that the governments of Hong Kong have been particularly good at. A city like Singapore has half the population density but feels like it has oodles more space. I would even say mega-oodles.

    Paxbritannia and Coolboy like this.

  5. #65

  6. #66

    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    2,866
    Quote Originally Posted by CharSiuNow
    I also realised that a large part of this is all about long term planning, not something that the governments of Hong Kong have been particularly good at. A city like Singapore has half the population density but feels like it has oodles more space. I would even say mega-oodles.
    And the ironic thing is, Singapore is actually smaller than HK in total area, yet feels a lot more roomy in comparison.

    Stuffing everyone into tiny shoeboxes as tightly as possible, as is the style in HK, does not contribute to positive mental health or social well-being. But I guess the government never paid as much attention to urban open space as it should have. No suprise there, but disappointing all the same.

  7. #67

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    691
    the Rent Control Task Force have to study at least three things:

    (1) the data and experiences from Hong Kong before 1998 when rent control was abolished. I think at least two to three decades of data there.
    (2) the laws and experiences from other common law countries.
    (3) the laws and experiences from European countries.

    It's not going to be easy.

    But I do think they can go easy on the economists' views on rent control. Most are against it and are well known.
    Last edited by nivek2046; 18-01-2020 at 05:24 PM.

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