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Attn: Pet owners!

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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by MovingIn07
    Breeding in a place where there are more dogs than people who want dogs is just irresponsible. If the puppy is an "accident" and looking for a good home, fine. I have no problem with that. But deliberately bred? NO.
    MovingIn is right. And furthermore, if this really was a legit trainer, they would not be "selling puppies that clients ask him to sell", but rather they would be making such dogs available to people who can offer a good home. The practice of selling dogs as a commodity is horrible, and the willingless of people to "pay" for a dog is based on ignorance.

    As for Labradors (or any "pure breed" fot that matter), such a breed mixed with a few other breeds will likely be both healthier, smarter, and less prone to inbread diseases. The only thing you don't get is the "prestige" of saying your dog is "pure".

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by MovingIn07
    Breeding in a place where there are more dogs than people who want dogs is just irresponsible. If the puppy is an "accident" and looking for a good home, fine. I have no problem with that. But deliberately bred? NO.
    I'd have to agree with Bryant on this one - there can be something to be said for owning a particular breed in some cases (particularly if you have a working dog that does a job that requires some sort of innate ability). There is also a huge difference between a responsible breeder (limits the number of liters they allow their animals to have, often has homes lined up before the pups are born, always take their dogs back irregardless of age or circumstance, is NOT in it for the money) and a puppy mill or backyard breeder, which are pretty much the opposite - they churn out animals for cash.

    I have a few dogs right now, some rescued (and of mixed origin, which is fantastic if you are looking for a companion dog), some not. The dog that falls into the "not" category is considered a protection dog, which isn't something that can be trained into most animals. It has proved its worth several times, including during a recent break in, it did exactly what it was born to do. The dog's breeder still emails me several times a year to find out how the dog is getting on and whether we need anything. We had to sign a contract to have the dog desexed when we got it from the breeder, which was their way of ensuring that we don't go around breeding irresponsibly.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by randy1
    The only thing you don't get is the "prestige" of saying your dog is "pure".
    A gross over-generalization. As pointed out earlier, there is a reason that has nothing to do with prestige to have a working dog that is of a particular breed.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by hello_there
    The dog's breeder still emails me several times a year to find out how the dog is getting on and whether we need anything.

    Just playing devils advocate here, but sounds like he is hoping to shift some more dogs your way.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by randy1
    The only thing you don't get is the "prestige" of saying your dog is "pure".
    Oh please! My lab is black and has no papers....this 'prestige' crap exists in your head and speaks more about you than caring dog owners.
    HowardCoombs likes this.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by bryant.english
    Oh please! My lab is black and has no papers....this 'prestige' crap exists in your head and speaks more about you than caring dog owners.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fiona in HKG
    What happened to Crimson, your 'bitsa'?
    Luckily, the day before I was going to get her, someone from the lab club heard of my situation and offered me a free labrador pup. We got what we really wanted, by 'we', I mean my family....to be honest, I would have taken the cool looking husky. We're very happy and I'll post photos later..

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by bryant.english
    Luckily, the day before I was going to get her, someone from the lab club heard of my situation and offered me a free labrador pup. We got what we really wanted, by 'we', I mean my family....to be honest, I would have taken the cool looking husky. We're very happy and I'll post photos later..
    I'm glad you're all happy, truly. I feel rather sad for Crimson who as you said, chose your boys when you visited. But if a lab is what you had set your hearts on, then it all turned out for the best as you might have regretted taking Crimson in the end.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by hello_there
    I'd have to agree with Bryant on this one - there can be something to be said for owning a particular breed in some cases (particularly if you have a working dog that does a job that requires some sort of innate ability). There is also a huge difference between a responsible breeder (limits the number of liters they allow their animals to have, often has homes lined up before the pups are born, always take their dogs back irregardless of age or circumstance, is NOT in it for the money) and a puppy mill or backyard breeder, which are pretty much the opposite - they churn out animals for cash.

    I have a few dogs right now, some rescued (and of mixed origin, which is fantastic if you are looking for a companion dog), some not. The dog that falls into the "not" category is considered a protection dog, which isn't something that can be trained into most animals. It has proved its worth several times, including during a recent break in, it did exactly what it was born to do. The dog's breeder still emails me several times a year to find out how the dog is getting on and whether we need anything. We had to sign a contract to have the dog desexed when we got it from the breeder, which was their way of ensuring that we don't go around breeding irresponsibly.
    Your response appears to assume that all rescue dogs are mongrels, which, from what I hear does not appear to be true. It appears that there are plenty of different breeds in there, mainly due to HK owners being such irresponsible owners and buying a "pure breed" for some reason or other without knowing how much work a dog entails.
    The main reason we don't have one here is that I wouldn't want a dog with my travel/work commitments - not fair on the dog. Otherwise I'd have one (and a cat) in a heartbeat.

  9. #19

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    It's amazing how much more attention abandoned dogs get than abandoned children (of which there are many in HK - My mother in law is fostering one for example)

    burrcl likes this.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Partridge
    Just playing devils advocate here, but sounds like he is hoping to shift some more dogs your way.
    And you would believe that on what grounds? They have had 2 litters in the last 6 years and I most certainly was not offered a puppy, nor would I have been offered one had I requested as her dogs are generally spoken for years before they are born (unlike someone in it for the money she doesn't increase the supply just because she has willing buyers - and there are others who breed animals out there like this...). When the breeder contacts us she inquires after our dog's health, etc. My mother, however, was offered (and has provided a loving home to) a dog that was returned to this breeder from someone a while ago, at no charge of course. Some (admittedly not most) people really do care about the animals they bring into this world...