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HK govt announced to allow private mainland Vehicles on our roads WTF!!!!!!!!!

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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by East_coast:
    On a positive note it will mean you can drive to a much cheaper supermarket and stock up. It should help break the duopoly.
    Most well to do Hongkies who can afford a dual cross border driving privilege, can afford to buy food here in Honkers, sourced from reputable suppliers. I don't see much of an attraction to cross border sourced food, for all the reasons that Boris listed. Not unless you want to abuse yourself or your family.

    The most important thing we have, is our health.

    Also by the way, if you only source groceries from chain supermarkets, then its no wonder food is costing you a fortune, reading into your duopoly comment.

    Source from local markets for bulk of your meats, veggies, herbs from lower rent area's, doing a weeks worth of shopping in one go, in a lower rent area, you will save a small fortune over a given year. There is a correlation between item cost, and the commercial rent of an area where shops are located, from my experience.

    It costs us a lot less to shop in Yuen Long for arguments sake, than it did in Sai Kung town, or at the gweilo aimed chain supermarket 10 minutes walk from our house. Depends how frugal you are I suppose...
    Last edited by Skyhook; 16-06-2010 at 10:45 AM.

  2. #32

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    MKahn's excellent post pretty much confirms every prejudice one might have about the Mainland - complete absence of the rule of law, pervasive corruption and stupidity, and an overwhelming sense of chaos. I try to limit my time there, personally.

    dumbdonkey and dear giant like this.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyhook:
    Most well to do Hongkies who can afford a dual cross border driving privilege, can afford to buy food here in Honkers, sourced from reputable suppliers. I don't see much of an attraction to cross border sourced food, for all the reasons that Boris listed. Not unless you want to abuse yourself or your family.

    The most important thing we have, is our health.

    Also by the way, if you only source groceries from chain supermarkets, then its no wonder food is costing you a fortune, reading into your duopoly comment.

    Source from local markets for bulk of your meats, veggies, herbs from lower rent area's, doing a weeks worth of shopping in one go, in a lower rent area, you will save a small fortune over a given year. There is a correlation between item cost, and the commercial rent of an area where shops are located, from my experience.

    It costs us a lot less to shop in Yuen Long for arguments sake, than it did in Sai Kung town, or at the gweilo aimed chain supermarket 10 minutes walk from our house. Depends how frugal you are I suppose...
    How does one know that the produce at local markets doesn't come from the same place as the stuff across the border?

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Freetrader:
    MKahn's excellent post pretty much confirms every prejudice one might have about the Mainland - complete absence of the rule of law, pervasive corruption and stupidity, and an overwhelming sense of chaos. I try to limit my time there, personally.
    It ain't prejudice, it's common fact.
    dear giant likes this.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by M Khan:
    The first unwritten rule of driving in China is to throw the rule book out of the window. Drivers may have remembered the rules well enough to pass the computerised test, but that then bears no practical relation to actual conditions on the roads. Knowing what the rule book says about approaching junctions doesn't prepare a student for the reality of what a Chinese intersection is like, or how to stay alive in negotiating it. The only rule of thumb is to expect every other driver to go for any (even faintly viable) gap in traffic and to not be properly looking out for road threats. Remember this and adapt your road presence accordingly.

    Indeed.


    I took a motorbike out on the streets of Jaipur, India, for the first time, completely alien to the concept of free-for-all driving.

    The first hour was utter hell. I thought I was doing everything right - observing lane discipline, not going at a stupid crazy pace, giving way, etc. - but my shirt was soaked in sweat, my shoulders were getting really tight and I must have been doing kegels. I kept getting 'nudged' to the side of the road and found myself getting held up behind cycle-rickshaws and horse-drawn carts and being over-taken by cyclists - deeply embarrassing for anyone on a motorbike.

    On the way back, I decided to ditch 'disciplined' driving/riding. Clearly the best way to go about it was to do what everyone else was doing, which sounds like a pretty normal thing to do just about anywhere, but over there that meant no road rules and simply keeping your eyes on the road ahead and on the side-view mirrors. It was the most fun and adrenaline-fuelled rides I have had on a two-wheeler.

    Having said that, I find it inconcieviable that any road transport authority could even contemplate, let alone permit, integrating motorists with two completely different styles of driving. To me that would be a recipe for disaster and I think traffic police are going to have their hands full with this one.

    This must be a directive from 'above'.
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    Last edited by Dreadnought; 16-06-2010 at 05:59 PM.

  6. #36

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    Tesco.com-south

    or even Wallmart

    Isn't the point of the private permits to foster integration between HK / SZ so it will just be a case of popping to a supermarket that happens to be a few Km's further away rather than in a different country?

    Tesco in China is a pleasent change to P&S or Wellcome.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by bdw:
    Well HK cars are allowed to drive on the mainland. So its probably right to allow it the other way as well.

    The cars you see on the road here with two licence plates are all HK registered with permission to drive in the mainland.
    Actually, those black "gong yue" license plates you see are restricted to people with businesses on the mainland. The plate itself cost around $80000 RMB, and one off an older vehicle can be sourced for around $250,000 RMB.

    Will the mainlanders be paying these types of fees to visit they business in Hong Koing? Of course not....

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by bdw:
    Ok I have found the facts:

    - HK private cars are currently allowed a permit to cross border
    - Mainland private cars are not allowed. Only coaches, goods vehicles, and official vehicles.

    Transport Department - Cross-Border Vehicles

    So as I said, its probably fair that if HK private cars are permitted into the mainland (under a permit system) then mainland cars should also be given the same privilege.

    Free and open access (which is probably the original topic of this thread, sorry for going off topic) is another story altogether.
    You are wrong. That permit system is for people involved in something like a driving club taking a convoy excursion to Tibet. If you show up at the border with just an HK registered car, and want to drive into Shenzhen, you cannot enter.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by jaykay:
    An individual applying would have to have a company in China with a certain amount of turnover so it would still be company related. And anyone here who would pay for a car individually rather than through a company would need a head examination - tax being the first and foremost reason.

    My old company had several vehicles - a BMW M5, and Audi S4 Avant, a Lexus LS460, a Toyota Previa and the obligatory Alphard (which I used to take x-border). They were "owned" by members of the family but all company vehicles at the end of the day (apparently the M5 has been replaced by a Nissan GT-R and the Audi by a BMW 335i Touring). So they all look "private" but they ain't!

    In saying this you can as an individual apply to the PSB, a monkey on Lion Rock could do the same, but without that company your application would be pinned to the wall in Shenzhen and laughed at all week long.

    I think you would have had more fun using the M5 or 335i. The Alphard is not fast enough.

  10. #40
    bdw
    bdw is online now

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    Quote Originally Posted by jpinst:
    You are wrong. That permit system is for people involved in something like a driving club taking a convoy excursion to Tibet. If you show up at the border with just an HK registered car, and want to drive into Shenzhen, you cannot enter.
    I realise you cannot just show up at the border and enter. You need a permit and special plates beforehand.

    However, I was just pointing out the official transport department website which specifically states HKSAR private cars are allowed to apply for a permit, and Mainland private cars are not.

    Transport Department - Cross-Border Vehicles

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