What to see?

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  1. #1

    What to see?

    Applying for a job in HK with my company and am getting sent out on a 'fact-finding' mission at the end of the month. I basically have 2 - 2 1/2 days to look around and get a general feel for the place. If I get the job, I will most likely look to live in DB or Tung Chung so will check out those places and will be working from home so don't need to check out a work location or anything.

    So where would you guys recommend visiting to get an idea of what life in HK would be like? Such as where to go on nights out, fun places to visit on weekends.

    Also, any advice on what expenses may differ wildly from the UK and things to check out from a budget point of view?


  2. #2

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    Lan Kwai Fong and Wan Chai are the main ex-pat drinking areas. Lan Kwai is more upmarket, while Wan Chai caters for a more down-to-earth but no less inebriated clientele. May want to check out Knutsford terrace which is on Kowloon side, although I'm sure to be lambasted by no end of people asking why, nevertheless it's an option with a better mix of locals and expats than LAn KWai or Wan Chai

    If your more interested in drinking than looking pretty you may want to give Lan Kwai a miss and head to Wan Chai or to Soho's McSorleys where they put pints first.

    For checking budgets, I always find checking out a supermarket a good spot for compasrison. Try Park n Shop or Wellcome, you'll find one around almost every corner on HK Island.


  3. #3

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    mcsorley's is opening a DB branch this week...

    there is a park'nshop in Db and a Taste supermarket in Tung Chung


  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rory:
    May want to check out Knutsford terrace which is on Kowloon side
    Or indeed the area near the Kowloon Shangri-La in TST East, which has Sticky Fingers, (allegedly a new Bulldogs imminently), and various other bars and restaurants opening up.

  5. #5

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    >> Knutsford terrace which is on Kowloon side, although I'm sure to be lambasted by no end of people asking why

    I actually do like popping into Knutsford terrace ... there are some really good restaurants in there.


  6. #6

    When it comes to budgeting you can pretty much budget on spending as much, if not more, on most things in Hong Kong as you would in the UK.

    Most of the time the price quality ratio here is ridiculous so you need to spend more than first anticipated (goes for accommodation and food especially).

    Last edited by automatic; 10-08-2006 at 01:16 PM.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by automatic:
    When it comes to budgeting you can pretty much budget on spending as much, if not more, on most things in Hong Kong as you would in the UK.

    Most of the time the price quality ratio here is ridiculous so you need to spend more than first anticipated (goes for accommodation and food especially).
    Sorry but I have to say this is in no way in line with my experiences of Hong Kong. Of course it totally depends on what you know as 'the UK' but I find going back to London extortionate.

    I lived in central London for a few years prior to returning to HK last year. For example, 2 bedroom basement flat in Highbury (not even Central London) with small garden will set you back £1800 a month. You can get something nicer and closer in HK for $25,000 easily.

    You simply don't need a car in HK which will save you a fortune. In London I got a £100 fine for pulling into a bus lane to let a police car past (the cameras don't make that distinction) twice in 2 weeks! Oh and good luck contesting it - means a day in court which means a day off work which means you are out of pocket either way, doubly so if you don't win the case.

    Public transport - go one stop on the tube between a zone you are looking at £2. MTR is far cheaper and it runs. Taxi from my office to home in London was £20, closer to £30 in rush hour or if after 8pm when the meters go up 30%. Unless you are off to the airport you would struggle to spend that much on a cab anywhere in HK. Cab from Heathrow into town? £80 or more is not unheard of. And good luck getting a cab home after the tubes have shut. Spend an hour trying to find an illegal mini cab to get you home for extortionate prices is more the norm.

    Restaurants here are far far cheaper than London unless you choose to eat in Hotels. But then again, £100 per head in a central London hotel is easily done.

    Most people seem to quote the cost of a drink in Lan Kwai Fong as an example of 'pricey' Hong Kong even though this is pretty much the most expensive place you can go to get a pint. Yet again, £5 or more for a G&T in a crowded Covent Garden or Soho boozer with no tab or table service and rude staff / doormen / midnight kicking out time is far from unusual. Go to a few local bars and restaurants here and you can drink and eat very cheaply.

    Tax rate is much lower here - no NI and a low income tax top bracket with generous allowances. No VAT or other government sales tax either on most purchases.

    So that covers food, housing, tax, booze and transport. Depends on where you are coming from in the UK and what other requirements you may or may not have.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by automatic:
    When it comes to budgeting you can pretty much budget on spending as much, if not more, on most things in Hong Kong as you would in the UK.

    Most of the time the price quality ratio here is ridiculous so you need to spend more than first anticipated (goes for accommodation and food especially).
    If you keep going to expat places, of course its more expensive.
    Going to "local' places is a lot cheaper. Local doesn't always mean out of the way or any less in quality.

    For example.
    I work in Pacific Place (huge expat mall) and yesterday I bought a panini sandwich for $55.
    Today, I went over to the mall connected to PP (Admiralty Centre) and bought a pasta salad & soup for $25.

    If you make the effort to walk the extra block to a local place, its definitely cheaper.
    If not, stick to the expat fancy places and get ripped off.
    Last edited by spork; 10-08-2006 at 02:42 PM.

  9. #9

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  10. #10

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    yup agreed with spork and hknewbi

    I'm back in London now and what would of lasted me a month in hk I spent in a week. So yes HK is cheaper than London for living.

    Shop in wet markets for your meat and veg rather than your supermarket and you're onto a 40% saving already on food.

    Mobile phone bills and internet access etc are all so much cheaper than U.K.

    The only things in HK which are more expensive than U.K is european foodstuffs and thats pretty much it. But then of course you're not going to HK to eat solely European food in the first place right?


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