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Hong Kong history discussion (post your question here!)

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  1. #1

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    Question Hong Kong history discussion (post your question here!)

    A curious mind wants to know... May I ask if anybody knows why during Hong Kong's colonial days, we would play "Scotland the Brave" and teach kids play bagpipes in school? I grew up here but somehow never happened to notice that it's really not British but Scottish. Why why why?


  2. #2

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    Maybe because the Black Watch were stationed in Hong Kong?

    Anyone remember the picture?

    Last edited by drumbrake; 07-08-2010 at 11:40 AM.

  3. #3

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    britain is actually: the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (this includes Wales and Scotland). Therefore bagpipes ARE British. they are NOT English. Scotland has been part of Britain since 1605 when King James VI of Scotland became King James I of England, thereby uniting the crowns and the countries. This happened on the death of Elizabeth I.

    PS> This isn't really the "Hong Kong History" it's British history.


  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Standup Girl:
    I grew up here but somehow never happened to notice that it's really not British but Scottish. Why why why?
    Do you mean it's Scottish, not English? Scotland is a part of the island of Great Britain therefore it is indeed both British and Scottish.

    However Scotland the Brave does seems be a defacto must play tune among baggies. Mate of mine who teaches the pipes regularly plays and teaches that tune, and he's Canadian.
    Posted via Mobile Device

  5. #5

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    Right right. I mean not English. Why would they then bring the Scottish music over instead of, like, maybe, um, I don't know, muffin?


  6. #6

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    The term 'English' was used to describe what is now called 'British'. Quite rightly I think the Welsh, Scots and other pikey's want to be recognised equally. In recent years the term 'British' is used to describe the collective culture n stuff and English, Welsh etc for specifics.
    Which is nice.
    Like it matters much.


    And in HK a lot of the 'English' that came here originally and contributed to establishing and developing HK were Scots. Good for them eh?


  7. #7

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    Load Toad, that's interesting.

    Also, I don't think this is a British history question. The school kids in question are kids from HK. This is a colonial history question.

    Last edited by Standup Girl; 07-08-2010 at 11:54 AM.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by drumbrake:
    Anyone remember the picture?
    A large copy of it is on the wall in the FCC Main Bar.

  9. #9

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    Just confirming that we are talking about THE picture, yes?


  10. #10

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    I believe so, yes. It is on the pillar facing the bar and away from the lounge area (where children are admitted). On the opposite pillar, in the interests of sexual equality there is a well-known picture of some Polynesian ladies.


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