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Tips on surviving HK's sticky, humid summer

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  1. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gruntfuttock:
    It's a mix. Stream trekking in summer is one (a couple of people most years). But simple heart attacks, dehydration etc are not uncommon. My gut feeling is that somewhere between 5 and 10 people die hiking in HK most years.

    Which is really a very tiny number given how many people do it and given that about 100,000 people die here every year.

    And frankly, I'd far rather die of a heart attack climbing up a nice hill than spend 6 months in a hospital slowly dying of cancer.
    We used to lose more than that in NZ every year - with a smaller population and fewer hikers.

  2. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gruntfuttock:
    They are macaques. And in my experience they don't attack people per se,
    Both MrMin and I have been attacked by these, without provocation and without any food on us (let alone showing). I ended up getting rescued by a local who picked up a big stick and whacked the monkey with it last time - less than 1km from the bus stop at Shing Mun reservoir on the really popular bit of the trail. Too many locals feed these little buggers and they have NO fear of humans at all now.

  3. #73

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    Feb 2013
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    on our first "family" visit to HK about 4 yrs ago my husband (whose work has taken him from months in the desert to ice fields and mountains) was caught by heat stroke at Ocean Park, whilst concerned at the time it was hard to be sympathetic when a) he wasn't wearing a hat b) he wanted to sit in the sun c) we didn't leave the hotel until 11am ish d) he wouldn't go home despite feeling terrible and being unwell. Growing up in Australia (esp above the 26') you know slip slop slap and to stay out of the sun from 11 to 2 , (husband is not Australian!) as for the humidity, wear linen, no make up and avoid the crowds!


  4. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by cheepo:
    Outsiders don't really know how dangerous the heat in Hong Kong is, when hiking in summer. I remember a few years ago an experienced New Zealand hiker died during a summer hike. I think he fell off a cliff or something and broke his leg and because of the heat he died before they found him (he died because of the heat, not because of the fall). So, my advise if you are new to HK (as the OP seems to be) is "don't go hiking". And if he must, then "don't go hiking alone, without a lot of water, and a fully charged phone". Of course the phone signal isn't all over HK territory, so you might get in trouble anyway.

    I also remember the HK government telling people better not to hike in summer, or at least not strenuous hikes or something. I don't really remember, because it doesn't concern me: I think only crazy people or masochists would consider hiking in this heat.
    Outsiders? Matt Dillon and Patrick Swayze?

  5. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gruntfuttock:
    I am convinced that in fact that guy was murdered by the other Air New Zealand pilot that was hiking with him. There were just too many things about the story as told by that other pilot that just didn't make sense to regular hikers. Remarkably the HK authorities seemed to let it go with very little meaningful investigation.
    No kidding? Got a link to the story? It's not like New Zealanders to get all violent or anything, is it now?

  6. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by knk:
    on our first "family" visit to HK about 4 yrs ago my husband (whose work has taken him from months in the desert to ice fields and mountains) was caught by heat stroke at Ocean Park, whilst concerned at the time it was hard to be sympathetic when a) he wasn't wearing a hat b) he wanted to sit in the sun c) we didn't leave the hotel until 11am ish d) he wouldn't go home despite feeling terrible and being unwell. Growing up in Australia (esp above the 26') you know slip slop slap and to stay out of the sun from 11 to 2 , (husband is not Australian!) as for the humidity, wear linen, no make up and avoid the crowds!
    The humidity got us when we first visited HK four years ago prior to moving here. Before, it was the dry scorching heat in Dubai. On a July day, I got bored at home and decided to go for a cycle. Didn't get further than a couple of Kms as it was soooo hot, about 48 deg and within that, I'd drunk my flask of water. Growing up in Queensland, just about every kid was slopped with sunscreen before heading off to school. Different colours of zinc cream war painted every just about every little face was a common sight in the early 80s. I'm trying to convince my husband who is not Aussie and has very fair easy burning skin, to don more sunscreen.

    Forget sugary drinks, cold soda water with fresh lime or lemon, and unsweetened ice teas are fantastic for quenching summer thirsts.
    Last edited by Natfixit; 23-06-2013 at 01:48 PM.

  7. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by Char Siu King:
    Outsiders? Matt Dillon and Patrick Swayze?
    Not to mention Tom Cruise, Emilio estavez, Ralph Macchio and Rob Lowe....

    What a cast... Huh ladies?
    Lootoo likes this.

  8. #78

  9. #79

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    Mar 2007
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    13,154
    Quote Originally Posted by robertlempriere:
    2. deodorant - skip the lynx, buy something fragrance free and natural (not to mention cheap). You can check out the natural 'crystal' type of rub on products, very good for keeping the bacteria(smell) away.
    Where do you find this type of product in Hong Kong ? I havent looked for it before but would like to try it since I developed an allergy to some ingredient found in deodorant.

  10. #80

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    Go to the jungles of Malaysia and stay there for two weeks... after which, your blood volume will have increased by 20%

    Then you'll be able to handle the weather here... but you can't spend one moment back in air con... or you will lose the blood volume...

    Getting back to HK is hard too... you can't take a flight... but there are still some refugee boats that will drop you off...

    The upside is you can donate blood more frequently... although they have great air con at the Red Cross... you'll have to ask for a non aircon room...and a great cuppa too


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