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GUILTY! (jay walking court summons )

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  1. #61

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    I'm guessing that the reason for sympathy is that most people have not been following Scrambler's ongoing soap opera saga. Only thought it was a couple of people though.


  2. #62

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    No sympathy from me for either scrambler's maid or jaywalking. I'm happy to be a jaywalker (I like thinking for myself!) but if I get caught, I'm responsible for the consequences.

    As for the maid, I've been following the scramber-maid "mini-series" and I was pretty shocked that the helper was still working for him. After she quit, I'd have never let her back but then I'd have fired her ass a long time ago if I had a hint of worry that she wasn't doing what she was asked to with the twins.


  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by HK_Katherine:
    It is interesting that so many people are soft on the maid.

    Ignoring the fact that Scramber has already highlighted she's incompetent at looking after his children, why would anyone pay the fine of an employee caught breaking the law and be lenient in allowing them time off to attend court?

    Is it because we all jay-walk all the time and feel sympathy for someone "caught out" in practise? That is, would you all feel the same way if the charge was assault or shop-lifting or something you generally don't do yourselves?

    Is it because you believe that all maids in HK are badly treated and so think that they deserve to not have to face the consequences of law-breaking? The mere fact that Scrambler was on here asking highlights to me that he does not mistreat his DH (the reverse appears to be true in fact!).

    It's interesting. Not clear to me if it's the 1) jay walking offence or 2) the fact it's a DH or 3) something else which provokes the reaction.

    Certainly if a member of my staff had to go to court for an offence I'd expect them to do it in their own time and pay their own fines. On the other hand, one just said they got called for jury duty, which is different. That is something companies should allow time off for, imho.
    I don't know, I don't see anyone here particularly soft on the maid (maybe except for scrambler himself, I mean why would he even bother to write a letter after the pain and hassle the maid has given him? So he's a nice guy ).

  4. #64

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    OK, I am not going to read the whole thread. I once got an attempt to be stopped for it by the brownies and completely ignored them (in a crowd) and got away with it. Would a police officer stop me I'd reply: Isn't that legal in HK? I am surprised, as I just followed what police officers permanently do.


  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    The worst menace on the roads (apart from motorcyclists) has to be those guys and girls who push little metal carts around with impunity, seemingly uncaring if they get run over or indeed if they swipe pedestrians shins.
    Surely the biggest menace on the roads are those typical SUV and limo drivers who routinely stop in yellow box junctions and park on pavements, forcing both vehicular and pedestrian traffic to try to edge around them.

    I jaywalk every day almost as a point of principle, in protest at HK's poor town planning which puts the tiny minority of drivers at the top of the pile, but then I am very alert and don't have a smartphone.

  6. #66

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    Nope I haven't read the whole scrambler maid saga, but I guess the reason for sympathy is that the fine is (relative to salary) a significant amount of money to the helper, but likely not so much to the employer.

    If she were a good employee, I'm sure many employers would help her out. If she is a liability (as seems the case) then they wouldn't.

    And yes, HK Katherine, I would think differently if it was assault or shoplifting. Wouldn't you?


  7. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by justjoe86:
    Nope I haven't read the whole scrambler maid saga, but I guess the reason for sympathy is that the fine is (relative to salary) a significant amount of money to the helper, but likely not so much to the employer.

    If she were a good employee, I'm sure many employers would help her out. If she is a liability (as seems the case) then they wouldn't.

    And yes, HK Katherine, I would think differently if it was assault or shoplifting. Wouldn't you?
    I would but I don;t think it's logical to do so! I think I only think of jaywalking as a lesser crime because I don't think it should be a crime... but logically crime is crime.... Interesting!

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by HK_Katherine:
    I would but I don;t think it's logical to do so! I think I only think of jaywalking as a lesser crime because I don't think it should be a crime... but logically crime is crime.... Interesting!
    There's only so far logic can take you. We are talking about sympathy here which definitely isn't very logical in itself!

  9. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by iliketurtles:
    I'd be interested to know why jaywalking is a crime here.
    For those interested, here's the history of why jaywalking became a crime: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-26073797

    It comes from America, which makes sense given that the dominant car culture came from America as well.

    TLDR:
    - "Jaywalking" was a slang term for someone from the country who was empty-headed like a blue jay.
    - Criminalization came from a propaganda campaign by car lobby groups in the 1920s and 1930s saying that streets are for cars.
    - Car makers portrayed car ownership as the ultimate expression of personal freedom.
    - The goal of city planners was to allow car traffic to go unhindered, thus making streets very pedestrian unfriendly.

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire ex-ax:
    Or they care more about their paint job.
    Oh, I never assumed that drivers yielded out of a sense of altruism. That would be crazy talk.

    It's probably a mix of drivers wanting to preserve their paintwork and realising that the trolley pushers can't be arsed to respond to honking.

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