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Native English Teacher Pay Rate

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  1. #11

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    The 120 hour course should be the CELTA or the Trinity CertTESOL. The Diploma would be 250+, although I'm not quite sure what these numbers are referring to. Generally, you will need to have the CELTA/Certificate to work as a language instructor. I'm assuming you have a Bachelor's degree? (Probably in something useful like "pottery" ) If you're open to or interested in working with children (primary and secondary school) you should really look into exactly what qualifications you would need to become a part of the NET scheme.
    So, if you don't have a TESOL certificate yet, then you should probably be looking at spending some time upon your arrival at getting better qualified. It will pay off in the long run, even if it's difficult initially financially. I know English for Asia offers this training, and I imagine others might comment with other organizations. This is the PolyU program that is also recognized here (I only think of it because I know a colleague of mine has done this course and is doing well now teaching-wise... she's just a really great teacher, though).
    Again, when you get here you might want to contact some of these tutor centers that offer private tuition for children/teens, as there's a lot of money in that. Kindergartens will also be very open to you, and then once you get your qualifications you can move on.
    I came here because my partner was transferred with this job. I've been fortunate, as I've been much better off here doing what I do than I was before in London, where I was just barely making pennies. The teacher room in the language center I was at in London was a hot bed of resentment and negativity due to our low wages and poor management (and box ticking). I feel much more appreciated here in HK, and I've been able to find a niche for myself working for exactly the kind of organization and students I love working with. Do spend some time thinking about what group of students or work environment you would most appreciate in the long-term and start setting up goals for getting there. It's been hard sometimes in HK, though, because there's really only so many courses you can teach per semester, but then if you want to take a little holiday in summer you have to turn summer work down and then have no income.
    Otherwise, I think living in HK is great. As with any place in the world, it has its upsides and its downsides, but what's most important above all is that it's different and that can give you a valuable perspective on life and your home. Be sure to explore Hong Kong's nature once you're here -- it's spectacular!
    Is your teaching experience with a place like Berlitz where they just trained you themselves and take you for your "native English speaker" status?


  2. #12

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    I've "liked" a lot of posts on this thread because it means I won't need to write it all again
    Will just add or emphasise a couple of things:
    1 - online TEFL courses are not worth anything to the sort of employers you would want to work for. If you're serious about teaching, invest the time and money for an internationally recognised cert. or dip.

    2 - there are language centres, and there are language centres, so do Due Diligence (and try and talk to current and former teachers) before you sign with one. Some are good, plenty are myehh, and there are also ones which are outstandingly horrible (think 38 contact hours in a room of under 75' sq with no natural light or proper ventilation).


  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    Thanks Drumbrake,
    Really great advice. If I do the 120 hour course it would be the intensive 4 week course where they get you to do class room scenarios etc. Do employers see a difference between 120 hour TEFL course certificate and the 250 hour TEFL Diploma or do they just put a tick in a box saying that it meets their minimum standard?
    Cheers,
    Ryan


  4. #14

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    Aug 2006
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    I know of the CELTA and Delta which I think is similar to the 120 and 250 hours you are mentioning. See Teaching qualifications | Cambridge English

    Basically, most employers would be happy with the CELTA, with the Delta is needed for promotion to a senior teacher position.


  5. #15

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    Jul 2014
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    Thanks for all your advice and information. So your suggestion is to not do the TESOL in my country before coming to HK but to do some courses over in HK? Do they accept the internationally accredited TESOL course certificate for 120 hours? I was hoping that if I got it out of the way here it would reduce the down time I spend in HK (start looking for work straight away).

    My previous teaching experience was with a after school tutoring company in Japan where you do a


  6. #16

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    There is only one place in Hong Kong that does the TESOL, that I know of, so spaces on the course are limited. It's also possibly cheaper where you are now.


  7. #17

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    Jul 2014
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    Thanks for your advice and information. I was hoping to get my qualification here in Australia before coming to HK to reduce the amount of down time (hoping to start looking for work straight away). So in essence the 120 hour TESOL / TEFL qualifications aren't recognised in HK and won't really assist in getting a job? That's a bit sad - there are so many companies / tertiary education places here peddling these certificates saying that they're internationally recognised.

    I'm happy enough to come to HK and start a course when I arrive if these qualifications are more readily recognised.

    The company I previously taught with in Japan was basically an after school English tutoring company. They had offices and locations all around the place. You would basically work in 8 different centres and over a 2 week period you'd visit them all. When the native English teacher wasn't around they'd have a local Japanese teacher who spoke English teach the kids. And yes - the company's only prerequisite was that you were a native English teacher who could obtain a visa to work in Japan. They provided a 2 or 3 week intense training when you arrived.


  8. #18

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    Jul 2014
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    Can anyone give me a comprehensive list of companies that I should avoid like the plague and companies that would be good to work for? I know that 1 person would personally have not worked for every single major company out there but perhaps you've got friends / associates that you have heard things from? I'd be interested in hearing about companies that have a reputation for treating their teachers well (pay, work conditions, hours etc) and also hear about companies that I should perhaps cross off my list.
    Thanks again


  9. #19

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    Nov 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryan_w:
    Can anyone give me a comprehensive list of companies that I should avoid like the plague and companies that would be good to work for? I know that 1 person would personally have not worked for every single major company out there but perhaps you've got friends / associates that you have heard things from? I'd be interested in hearing about companies that have a reputation for treating their teachers well (pay, work conditions, hours etc) and also hear about companies that I should perhaps cross off my list.
    Thanks again
    That would be a long long list and impractical to note down here! One way to tell the quality of a language centre is how concerned they are about your qualifications and experience. The less concerned they are the more I would worry (as a generalisation). Some centres go so far as to only worry about the colour of your skin rather than the quality of your teaching. You should be able to get a feeling for this in your contact / communication with the centre.
    chingleutsch likes this.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by ryan_w:
    Thanks for your advice and information. I was hoping to get my qualification here in Australia before coming to HK to reduce the amount of down time (hoping to start looking for work straight away). So in essence the 120 hour TESOL / TEFL qualifications aren't recognised in HK and won't really assist in getting a job? That's a bit sad - there are so many companies / tertiary education places here peddling these certificates saying that they're internationally recognised.

    I'm happy enough to come to HK and start a course when I arrive if these qualifications are more readily recognised.

    The company I previously taught with in Japan was basically an after school English tutoring company. They had offices and locations all around the place. You would basically work in 8 different centres and over a 2 week period you'd visit them all. When the native English teacher wasn't around they'd have a local Japanese teacher who spoke English teach the kids. And yes - the company's only prerequisite was that you were a native English teacher who could obtain a visa to work in Japan. They provided a 2 or 3 week intense training when you arrived.
    The 120-hr TESOL/TEFL (the one with classroom practice) should be recognised just fine. It's the online version that's not readily accepted.

    Can others confirm?
    usehername likes this.

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