Chinese Wife British/Irish Husband

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  1. #41

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    107

    To get multiple entry, you need to have her write a request for it.


  2. #42

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    19

    I don't see how going to bkk could solve the problem? You mean the 7-day-transit in HK for mainlanders? Please keep in mind that your wife is PRC citizen and and everything is so difficult for her when travelling to HK.

    about the CPV extension, how do you know they don't allow if you dont try? Anyway, I'm sure HK immigration officers in Wan Chai will be more than happy to help you with ur problem. You should ask them directly and ask for the best solution. They are very nice and helpful, trust me.

    Good luck.


  3. #43

    Hey

    I am a U.S. citizen living in Shenzhen, married to a wonderful woman from Jaingsu province and working in HK with a temporary HK I.D. I travel everyday from shenzhen to Mongkok. We are having our child in two weeks. We will get our child naturalized as a US citizen in Guangzhou after he is born. We want to move to HK next spring. I am seeking to get my wife a HK pass as well so she can go to HK. Same situation as you. I've talked to many folks about this. No easy solution. I am going to the US consulate next week to consult with them for advice. I;ve been to HK immigration in Wanchai. They said they don't deal with PRC folk. "They should go to their hometown and apply for entry." Blah blah. So we are going to try and see if we can get around that. Int he mean time, if you come up with any helpful ideas, please let us know and I promise I'll do the same for you via this web forum or your direct email if you want to send it my way.
    Best of luck


  4. #44

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    107

    Have your child born in HK if possible. The child will then be a HK PR with Chinese citizenship and will be able to get a US passport from the consulate here on the strength of your parentage


  5. #45

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    23,205

    hamlett22,

    Do you really want to condemn you child to a life of being taxed by a country s/he may never even live in? Why not just go with the HK/China citizenship to start with and let them decide whether they want to take on the cost of US Citizenship when they are old enough to make their own decision? It's pretty hard for them to renounce it effectively once you have imposed it on them.


  6. #46

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    107

    If a US citizen is US born, all their children are US citizens automatically. Also, children born in China of a Chinese citizen parent are automatically Chinese citizens. Chinese citizens born in HK are also automatically HK Permanent Residents. So the choice isssue doesn't arise. The child will have both nationalities if born in China, but will have less paperwork hassles and a better class of Chinese nationality if born in HK


  7. #47

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    130

    other options

    Have you ever considered living in Shenzhen and commute to HK ? Partner with your wife and open a branch office in Shenzhen. This will take care of your visa.

    How about investment immigration ?


  8. #48

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
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    Roger,

    So how does that work since China doesn't permit dual nationality? You cannot (legally, although many peoiple do) hold any other citizenship if you are Chinese, as I understand it.

    (And how did it work until recently when the US didn't either?)


  9. #49

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    107

    The Chinese nationality law consists of 18 articles and can be fitted onto one side of A4 paper. (Compare this to the UK or US laws). Article 3 states that China does not recognise the dual citizenship of Chinese nationals. It does not forbid it. China also doesn't recognise the Republic of China on Taiwan, but it exists anyway.

    There are provisions in the law stating that a Chinese citizen who settles in a foreign country and naturalises there automatically loses their Chinese citizenship (Art 9), although if the fact is kept hidden from the Chinese government, a Chinese passport can still be obtained. HK basically requires declaration of the fact for this provision to have effect.
    Those who become Chinese citizens also have to give up their other citizenship(s) if their applications are accepted (Art 8 & 13). However, there is no provision in the law covering someone born in China of mixed Chinese-foreign parentage, except that the child is considered a Chinese citizen from birth (Art 4). You may apply to have the child's Chinese citizenship renounced after the birth (Art 10 & 11), but there is no legal requirement to do so.
    This is therefore one of the ways in which a person may legally hold Chinese and foreign citizenship.

    Last edited by Roger; 21-09-2005 at 08:37 PM.

  10. #50

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    35

    Very interesting. Just for clarification. If you are born in the PRC, to PRC parents, are you legally allowed to apply for dual citizenship in the US? From reading other posts it seems like the PRC doesn't recognize dual nationality but the US and other countries do.


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