Brick sidewalks /walkways

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  1. #1

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    Brick sidewalks /walkways

    Seemingly, HK has invested loads of money in upgrading particular neighborhoods and business districts. One 'supposed' improvement has been brick sidewalks / walkways.

    Large sums of $$$$ was put into such a project(s) that wouldn't the government overseer expect the NEW brick sidewalks / walkways would be leveled off.

    Seems as if the brick was put down and still follows the sloping and dips of the original sidewalk / walkways. Still the problem of HUGE & MASSIVE puddles still exist - not having resolved the problem that also previously existed.

    Am I the only one that thinks that is yet another fine example of wasted government funds?

    [YES THIS IS A RANT]

    Last edited by Alby; 06-04-2008 at 11:09 PM.

  2. #2

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    I'm not sure about this, but I believe one of the justifications for brick/tile pavements is that when (as so often occurs in this town) a utility needs to get at existing ducts/cables or lay new ones the effort, noise and general disruption caused is far less than if the pavement were done in solid concrete. Concrete/asphalt require pneumatic drills, but tiled surfaces can be lifted (and relaid) quietly, quickly, and without generating the useless rubble that solid surfaces do.


  3. #3

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    The purpose of the OP was not the purpose but the quality

    "Seems as if the brick was put down and still follows the sloping and dips of the original sidewalk / walkways. Still the problem of HUGE & MASSIVE puddles still exist - not having resolved the problem that also previously existed."

    The labourers where obviously following the premise, One country, two systems - but not in respect of roadwork good practice. We should all hold our heads up high, but not too high, lest we trip over on the uneven sidewalk.


  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by PDLM:
    I'm not sure about this, but I believe one of the justifications for brick/tile pavements is that when (as so often occurs in this town) a utility needs to get at existing ducts/cables or lay new ones the effort, noise and general disruption caused is far less than if the pavement were done in solid concrete. Concrete/asphalt require pneumatic drills, but tiled surfaces can be lifted (and relaid) quietly, quickly, and without generating the useless rubble that solid surfaces do.
    Now this makes complete sense to me but I have witnessed the layering of brick throughout TST and Jordan with it just put over the existing sidewalk /walkway. But, in order to carry through on your reasoning wouldn't the original sidewalk need to be removed via a jack hammer or some other tool?

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris:
    The labourers where obviously following the premise, One country, two systems - but not in respect of roadwork good practice. We should all hold our heads up high, but not too high, lest we trip over on the uneven sidewalk.
    There should be warning signs as I have seen an increase of people falling and tripping - particularly the elderly.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alby:
    Now this makes complete sense to me but I have witnessed the layering of brick throughout TST and Jordan with it just put over the existing sidewalk /walkway. But, in order to carry through on your reasoning wouldn't the original sidewalk need to be removed via a jack hammer or some other tool?
    Yes it would - if that's what they're doing then obviously my reasoning doesn't apply. I haven't really studied this here - I just know that's how & why it's done in the UK. Maybe it hasn't been properly thought through here (but maybe also the UK method wouldn't work in places like LKF where you have a steep slope which regularly gets heavy rain and heavy vehicles, none of which is conducive to a brick surface remaining smooth).
    Last edited by PDLM; 07-04-2008 at 08:18 AM.