Like Tree163Likes

I remember

Reply
Page 10 of 23 FirstFirst ... 2 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 18 ... LastLast
  1. #91

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    624
    Quote Originally Posted by jayinhongkong:
    Phone numbers before the '2' prefix and when you only needed '3' and '5' when you were calling across the harbor.
    This will only interest accountants and actuaries.

    HK Island was 5, Kowloon was 3, the New Territories were 12, later changed to 0.

    The traces of this remain in some present-day numbers. If it begins 25 it's probably on HK Island, and 23 is probably Kowloon.

    When speaking phone numbers - instead of saying "five" or "three", people would say "Hongkong side" or "Kowloon side".

    Some shops kept their phones at the front near the street and, as local calls were in effect free, they would let anyone use the phone if they just needed to make a quick call. One would quickly ask permission and it would quickly be given. (I was never confident enough to do it myself.)

    Almost every restaurant, and some shops and supermarkets, provided a phone for customers' use. When repairmen or deliverymen came to your flat, they almost always made a few calls on your phone.

    * * * * * * * *

    The British and Chinese ways of numbering floors were both commonly used. The sign in a lobby might say 10th Floor in English and 11th Floor in Chinese. Arranging a delivery, you would say, "Press 10."

    Postmen had to cope, not only with two languages, but with two ways of numbering floors.
    INXS and drumbrake like this.

  2. #92

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    624
    Quote Originally Posted by R.O.:
    I remember Kentucky Fried chicken opened in HK, the first American fast food restaurant - and then closed down.

    Actually, this was before my time, but people were still talking about it. They said: We Chinese have many ways of cooking chicken, but Kentucky have only one.

    Another reason why they didn't succeed, I was told, was that they opened in Kowloon. When McDonalds came, in about 1976, their first branch was in Causeway Bay.
    From Restless Empire by Odd Arne Westad:

    The first foreign fast food restaurant inside China opened in 1987, a Kentucky Fried Chicken ... in central Beijing. Tens of thousands of people walked slowly past, just to get a glimpse of what was going on inside. Almost nobody could afford to eat there, and over the first few weeks the Beijing authorities had to dole out special 'foreign exchange certificates' - the only money foreign businesses were authorized to accept - to its senior cadre in order to ensure a minimum of trade.

  3. #93

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    624

    I remember that the first time I went to Yuen Long there were a couple of cows or bullocks grazing beside the main road at the edge of the town. As I had just come from India, this didn't seem strange at all. I think there was also a bullock standing in the middle of the road where the light railway is now, but that may be a false memory.

    * * * * * * * *

    I remember that tourists used to climb a hill at Lok Ma Chau so that they could look at China. That was the best they could do (I did it myself). If they were lucky, they would see a real Chinese farmworker in a real Chinese field, and perhaps even a real Chinese border guard.

    INXS likes this.

  4. #94

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    DB
    Posts
    3,713
    Quote Originally Posted by R.O.:
    I remember that the first time I went to Yuen Long there were a couple of cows or bullocks grazing beside the main road at the edge of the town. As I had just come from India, this didn't seem strange at all. I think there was also a bullock standing in the middle of the road where the light railway is now, but that may be a false memory.

    * * * * * * * *

    I remember that tourists used to climb a hill at Lok Ma Chau so that they could look at China. That was the best they could do (I did it myself). If they were lucky, they would see a real Chinese farmworker in a real Chinese field, and perhaps even a real Chinese border guard.
    Oh yes, I remember doing the Lok Ma Chau lookout point....and some American tourists remarking "That's Red China over there".

  5. #95

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    368

    Longer ferry trips with piers in same location for 57 years?

    [QUOTE=R.O.;2703386]And the crossing was smoother when the harbour was wider.

    It took long enough to smoke a leisurely cigarette. Smoking was permitted in part of the upper deck. (I remember smoking.)

    - - - How can that be, since the TST pier has been in same location since 1906, and the third generation Central pier, built in 1957 near Edinburgh Place, stayed in place until its decommissioning on 11 November 2006. Sure they've reclaimed a lot of the harbor for construction sites, but unless you are remembering ferry trips from almost 60 years ago, the distance between the TST and Central piers has not changed until 8 years ago.


  6. #96

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    6,106

    I remember the days when we had really good and long quality discussions here about life topics and trolls would not last long ^^

    Natfixit likes this.

  7. #97

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    South of Sweden
    Posts
    4,033

    I remember when phone booths were king, and when people walked , they knew where they were going, and were aware of their surroundings. If you tripped, the footpath was uneven, not because you bumped into someone.

    I remember getting changed in a phone booth when I was young and didn't care for Dr Who or what others thought. I still don't.


  8. #98

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Tsim Sha Tsui
    Posts
    3,987

    I remember back in UK, people found a way around paying super high IDD charges at phone booths with the use of one of those small dialers you get with answer machines. There was many of these around and the Chinese community would queue up late at night at service station telephones.


  9. #99

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    624

    I remember smoking.Name:  Cigarettes.jpg
Views: 180
Size:  397.4 KB


  10. #100

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    624

    More data for accountants and actuaries.

    There were ferries between Central and Kwun Tong, Hung Hom, Tsim Sha Tsui, Jordan Road, Tai Kok Tsui, Sham Shui Po, Mei Foo, and Tsuen Wan; between Wanchai and Hung Hom, Central, and Jordan Road; between North Point and Kwun Tong, Kowloon City, and Hung Hom; and between Shau Kei Wan and - I don't remember. There were vehicular ferries, double deckers, carrying mostly lorries, between Central and Jordan Road; and between North Point and Kowloon City and Kwun Tong.

    I learnt the Cantonese sentence I have to cross the harbour and the English word vehicular.

    The Sham Shui Po and Wanchai piers were at the edge of large, new, bare reclamations which put people off, just as they were put off more recently by the walk to the new Star Ferry pier. The Wanchai pier later revived to some extent.

    I used to enjoy the Wanchai - Jordan Road ferry, which was a journey through the harbour as well as across.

    Fiona in HKG likes this.

Reply
Page 10 of 23 FirstFirst ... 2 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 18 ... LastLast