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  1. #131

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    So the photographer was in Hullett House maybe? The railway terminus would appear to be the rather ugly Cultural Centre now?
    I think from Star House, probably early 1970s.

    Quote Originally Posted by closedcasket:
    Anyone know what the billboard relates to? Would that be Hennessy Road in Wan Chai? Hennessy liquor?

    Also, the harbor looks so big!!
    Hennessy VSOP

    And it's on HK island where the harbour has shrunk. I'd guess at least 100 metres.

  2. #132

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    Much more than 100m!

    When the tram line was built it was on the waterfront!


  3. #133

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gruntfuttock:
    Much more than 100m!

    When the tram line was built it was on the waterfront!
    Not since the date of that photo though.

    The railway terminus was demolished in 1974, I think, and the KCR terminus moved to Hung Hom. A very foolish decision, seeing as they then had to extend the tracks back to TST 30 years later.
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  4. #134

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    Quote Originally Posted by bookblogger:

    The railway terminus was demolished in 1974, I think, and the KCR terminus moved to Hung Hom. A very foolish decision, seeing as they then had to extend the tracks back to TST 30 years later.
    Yes, it was ironic.

    But Hung Hom Station could stand as an example of good planning. When it was new it was huge and under-used - part of it was even closed off. But the planners expected that it would be needed later.
    bookblogger and imparanoic like this.

  5. #135

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    Quote Originally Posted by flameproof:
    There were banknotes smaller then 1Cent
    Actually, I think the 1 cent notes were the smallest.

    They were issued by Hongkong Bank - colourfully printed on one side only of small slips of plain white paper. I read that they were used for accounting purposes, but I prefer to think that the Bank issued them for fun. They were in The Guinness Book of Records as the lowest-value banknotes in the world.
    Last edited by R.O.; 21-04-2014 at 11:21 PM.
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  6. #136

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    Yes, I used to get bundles of those as change at the post office. Wish I had kept some.


  7. #137

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    I remember that some street dwellers used to build semi-permanent shelters using cardboard, old sacks, strips of cloth, and so on. Despite the poverty of the materials they were neat and tidy little places. There was one man who built a tiny mud wall, an inch high, to mark his territory on the pavement.

    There was another living just next to the Wanchai ferry pier, on the left-hand side as you approach it. He had draped some cloth over the railing to break the wind from the harbour. He looked after two cats. I once saw him sitting in his shelter, tenderly cleaning their fur with a moist brush.

    The Beggar's Dog & Widow's Cat,
    Feed them & thou wilt grow fat.
    - William Blake

    * * * * * * * * * * * *

    I was living in a 15-storey building in Kowloon. I knew that there were people living on the roof and one day I went up to have a look.

    I seemed to step into another place. There were four little cottages on the roof, each with its own neat little fenced-in yard, each aligned to one of the four flats on the floors below. There was no-one there. I felt as if I had stepped into deep countryside. All the noise of the city seemed to vanish. The buildings might have been little more than huts, but it was all so homely and orderly, and I was so astonished, that I saw them as pretty little country cottages. In one of the yards there were two little dogs. They had never seen or smelt anyone like me but they were not alarmed, they were excited, and they ran round and round together in their little space. Their panting, and the pattering of their feet, were the only sounds I heard. I only stayed a minute; I felt I didn't belong there.

    Last edited by R.O.; 26-04-2014 at 01:20 PM.
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  8. #138

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    I remember that I used to see a lot of tailless, or stumpy-tailed, cats. I was first told that the tails had been cut off because they brought bad luck. Then someone who I think was better informed told me it was a genetic oddity. They seem to be less common now. Even the strays have tails (though I saw a tailless one a few days ago).

    * * * * * * * *

    I remember that there used to be bicycle delivery men, generally old men on sturdy bicycles with large baskets. They were the only bicycles one saw in the city.

    I once saw one of the men blown off his bike when a lorry speeded by too close to him. He landed on his hands and knees astride his bike. I don't think he was seriously hurt but the seat of his trousers was split and, as he knelt on the ground, his shirt-tail and underwear poking out, the poor old chap, who was well over sixty, started crying. The lorry driver came back to help him.

    * * * * * * * *

    About 1980, when there was a lot of illegal immigration but also a labour shortage, the government had, or condoned, a 'touch base' policy: any illegal immigrant who made it to the Immigration Department on Hong Kong Island was permitted to stay. Queues would form each morning before the doors opened.

    At the time it was not compulsory to carry an identity card. Suspected illegal immigrants who were stopped before reaching base were apparently given challenges like, "Name two cinemas in Kowloon," or, "What do you call a bread roll with a sausage in it?"

    There was speculation in the media that a quarter of a million, or whatever, new immigrants had been allowed in. I heard a government official, from the census department I suppose, interviewed about this on the radio. Sounding very testy, he said, "If there really are a quarter of a million extra people, they're very strange people because they're not falling ill, they're not having accidents, they're not dying, they're not committing crimes, they're not going to school, and they're not having babies."

    bffallo and bookblogger like this.

  9. #139

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    Why did they get rid of so many nice buildings and replace them with ugly ones?

    bookblogger likes this.

  10. #140

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    Money, Joe.

    justjoe86 likes this.

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