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  1. #81

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    Nov 2011
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    I remember when my family lost citizenship in HK in 1997.


  2. #82

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    Apr 2010
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    HKHK154 - Please can you explain?


  3. #83

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    Dreadnought wrote last week: I remember the orange check-in desks at Kai Tak and the split-flap boards showing the flight status.

    I remember that there was a quiet corner in the airport where schoolchildren used to do their homework.

    I remember being in the 'sitting-out area' in Ma Tau Chung Road, directly under the flight path and not far from the beginning of the runway. The planes appeared menacingly, but safely, over the buildings - you heard them before you saw them - and then passed maybe fifty or sixty feet, five or six storeys, over your head. The old codgers carried on reading their papers and playing Chinese chess.

    * * * * * * * *

    I remember that in dim sum restaurants there was no waiting-list. You found a table where it looked as if the occupants were nearly finished, and stood over them until they left.

    All the plates and dishes were left on the table, and tallied up by the waiter. The shape and size indicated the price.


  4. #84

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    Apr 2010
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    I remember a strange encounter. One sleepless night I went for a walk in East Tsim Sha Tsui. It is reclaimed land and had only recently been opened up. There were no buildings yet where I was walking but the sites were enclosed by high wooden walls. It was the dead of night. Everything was still and I thought deserted, but I turned a corner and came face to face with another westerner. He was tall and wiry, and dressed like a boy scout in shorts and a short-sleeved shirt. Over one shoulder he was carrying, like a rifle, an old-fashioned besom or straw broom, and over the other a spade. He looked utterly eccentric. We were both taken aback, but passed each other without acknowledgement and the moment was over. What on earth was he doing?

    * * * * * * * *

    I remember coming across two ambulance men at the very moment that they were rescuing an abandoned new-born baby. It was in a quiet pedestrian lane between some blocks of flats in Tuen Mun. The baby was in a large laminated-paper carrier bag on the ground next to a litter bin. The ambulance men were kneeling. Instead of lifting the baby out, they were cutting the bag open from top to bottom. They did it silently and steadily, without haste. A few people were watching. When they lifted the baby up I couldn't help craning forward to see what sex it was, though it didn't matter and I don't remember. A very young policeman, who was watching as spellbound as I was, told me to step back. The child will be twenty years old this year.


  5. #85

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    Apr 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by R.O.:

    I remember that every cinema used to show films at the same times - 12.30, 2.30, 5.30, 7.30, and 9.30 - and foreign films were cut, sometimes drastically, to fit this schedule.
    When you bought your ticket, the seat number would be scrawled on it in thick pencil. It was only legible if you already knew what it said.

    The cinema's toilets would be closed a few minutes before the end of the show so that no-one could hang about.

    You couldn't leave through the front of the cinema as it would be filling up with people for the next show. You were hustled out through the side and back doors. You generally found yourself in a noisome alley, and people would look about in confusion, wondering which way to go.

    There was sometimes almost a party atmosphere in the cinema. Every seat would be filled in a large auditorium with stalls and a circle (called a loge), and a lot of people would take in something to eat and drink, bought from hawkers in front of the cinema. One reason why they wanted the audience out so quickly was that there was sometimes so much litter to clear up.

    "How deep is your love?" I remember the audience singing along in Saturday Night Fever.

    I remember the first full frontal female nudity in a HK film. The audience gave a great shout.

  6. #86

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    Feb 2013
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    I remember my father taking me to watch Star Wars, and coming home on the 23. At our stop on Caine Road, some punks hit him on the head and he called the police, and the entire bus stopped there to wait. I don't remember what happened after that. I do remember that 23s back then were "Jumbo" Daimler Fleetlines...


  7. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by joyojc:
    I don't remember what happened after that. I do remember that 23s back then were "Jumbo" Daimler Fleetlines...
    Let me guess... you're now an accountant? Or maybe even an actuary?
    HK2A430 likes this.

  8. #88

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    Feb 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gruntfuttock:
    Let me guess... you're now an accountant? Or maybe even an actuary?
    No, I'm retired. Seriously though, I don't get the reference...

    Edit: never mind, I think you must be talking about that dude who quit his job to be a bus driver.

    Double edit: just found the recent WSJ article on bus fans in HK, thanks Gruntfuttock!
    Last edited by HK2A430; 30-01-2014 at 09:36 PM.

  9. #89

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    Aug 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by joyojc:
    I remember my father taking me to watch Star Wars, and coming home on the 23. At our stop on Caine Road, some punks hit him on the head and he called the police, and the entire bus stopped there to wait. I don't remember what happened after that. I do remember that 23s back then were "Jumbo" Daimler Fleetlines...
    Not HK, but I remember after a late work shift, I had caught the Victoria line tube to Seven Sisters, and changed to the overground. While waiting for the train to Rectory Road ( I lived in Stoke Newington then) , this punk started chatting me, thick Glaswegian accent but really nice guy. Offered to share his bottle of Heineken with me. Visions of the movie, Trainspotting went though my head but although I can't remember much of the conversation ( 15 years ago!) , we had a few laughs, and I went home with a smile on my face. Maybe we were both laughing at how much my Dr Martins were blistering my ankles....

    Never been mugged, but last time I lived in UK, walking back from the borough markets and majestic wines, I was confronted by a group of very young drunks , the female ringleader swinging a PET bottle of Magners cider then the next thing I know, they're chasing me down the street . I'm pretty fit when it comes to making tracks and armed with shopping plus four wine bottles, hot footed it through Waterloo station to the tube.

  10. #90

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    Apr 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by R.O.:

    I remember the first full frontal female nudity in a HK film. The audience gave a great shout.
    Mrs R.O., who used to work in a department store, told me a poignant little story about one of the actresses.

    One New Year's Eve she came to the store and tried on a dress which she loved, but couldn't pay for. "She didn't want to take it off." Using the store's phone, she called a list of men, all of them westerners, asking them to buy it for her. They all refused. After one call, she exclaimed, "He hung up on me!" In the end, she had to put her own dress back on, and leave.

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