Is there a way out for air pollution in Hk?

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  1. #1

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    Is there a way out for air pollution in Hk?

    I am just sick of air pollution in HK. It's august so the sky is still blue. But things might get worse when sept comes. What CAN we do??


  2. #2

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    Of course there is. It takes the committment of the HK AND China government and industry, huge amounts of money, policing and about 5 years.
    It would include: Shutting down all factories in HK and pearl river delta (or refurbishing them with state-of the art emissions controls); switching all buses to LPG or CNG; policing all vehicles to ensure they are properly tuned and did not emit any exhaust; ensuring all coal fired power stations had FGD and low nox burners or converting to nuclear/LNG..... Shall I go on?


  3. #3

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    Nothing, we're all doomed... Humans are way too greedy and selfish to change their ways so help yourself, live healthy and get air purifiers.


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    Gilleshk, you know what - we finally agree on something.

    Leekf7, I'm completely over the pollution too but I just don't believe HK is going to turn it's back on consumption, on an individual or government level so I don't see how things will change. The only thing we can do is move to somewhere that still has fresh air and hope not too many people follow us...


  5. #5

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    Actually I disagree. Pollution has been bad in many places in the past (London, LA etc) and has improved with investment in new technology. As China matures the Pearl River delta factories will be required to clean up. Investment in clean energy and transport in HK is not that expensive, it will happen over time just as lead-free petrol has been introduced and FGD has been forced on power plants all over the world. Just takes time for action. Maybe not imminent, but not never either.


  6. #6

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    Movingin07, I think that while what you say is true, it is a very, very long way off for China and by default, HK too. China doesn't have a good track record of caring about its people and things like quality of air won't come in high on the agenda especially at the expense of generating revenues. They promised a lot for these Olympics and delivered on little so I wonder what sort of pressure could be placed on them to change their ways and if any country is willing to actually go out on a limb and really challenge them on this issue. China is not LA nor is it London. These two cities are places where people speak their mind and don't put up with restrictions on their quality of life unless it's impossible to change. The Chinese aren't allowed to voice any complaints making it nice and convenient for the government to do whatever they want.

    If it were nearly any other country I'd agree with you but just not China!


  7. #7

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    While there may have been some improvements in western countries but it's a drop in the bucket, people will never change their ways unless they see an imminent threat or if it hits their wallets.

    Case and point...best selling vehicles in the US were all fuel guzzling mammoth until finally this year, the Civic rose to number one. Think it's because of global warming or pollution? Price at the pump...It's all about $$$

    People with a social conscience are a small minority and governments are all in bed with big businesses who have no interests in doing the severe changes that are necessary to make a significant difference.

    Take care of your own immediate environment and get ready for global warming and all that it will bring because we're way too greedy, selfish and stupid to make a big enough difference. We'll react to the problem when it hits us...build dams, sea walls, air con whatever is needed but we're not going to change our lifestyle...


  8. #8

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    Actually I think the Olympics and the air quality in Beijing is the opposite of the example you quote. It forced the authorities to realise the impact that they were having on air quality and forced them to take draconian measures. Any, by and large, they HAVE worked. And all the local people can see that, and so can the government.

    Sure, the chinese are an oppressed people unable to speak their mind (sarcasm here - don't red blob me) - but as they start earning more money they are going to care about the air their breathe and the future life-expectancy of their children, JUST THE SAME as the people in London at the turn of the century who banned coal-burning fires and removed the smog, that was killing thousands each year.

    I agree, it may take time.

    I think the air quality re the Olympics will actually become the turning point.

    I work in the energy industry, and I have seen the presentations given by the 'powers that be' in China regarding efficiency improvements in factories (read, cleaner and SAVES MONEY) and the renewable energy projects going on in China (read, cleaner and foreigners pay them to do it). What is happening is real - it really IS improving. They really DO care about air quality, possibly just for it's own sake, definitely for the value-added benefits of lower costs and money paid to them for renewables.

    It may not happen in the next 5 years, but I think within 10 we will see a significant difference.


  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by aussiegal:
    They promised a lot for these Olympics and delivered on little

    I think you are wrong on that one aussiegal - apart from banning 50% of cars and closing down factories so producing the lowest pollution levels for years, they have done nothing. They promised, they delivered as far as I can see. Once the people see what is possible I think there will be more pressure for change.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile:
    I think there will be more pressure for change.
    The only pressure that the people are interested in is the one what will put money in their pocket... and the chinese government is not exactly famous for bowing to public pressure

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